Does “Manspreading” Have a Scientific Explanation?

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James Lindsay

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James Lindsay is an author, mathematician, podcaster, and founder of New Discourses: an online resource for educating the public on the dangers of the "Critical Social Justice" movement. His latest book, co-authored with Charles Pincourt, is "Counter Wokecraft: A Field Manual for Combatting the Woke in the University and Beyond."

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Well, that's one of the problems with some ideas that promote, air quotes, feminism, is that they treat women as if they can't see things the way that men do, so they need extra attention. Exactly. Or extra help or extra assistance. My favorite one with that kind of like naval-gazing, critical approach. So let me preface just because we have to in this day and age. James, you support feminism? Which one? Same as Black Lives Matter, right? Which one do you mean? So that said, one of my favorite patterns is thing happens to everybody and then feminists think it's oppression against women. Feminists blame patriarchy. So it's like people interrupt. And it's like people interrupt women. And so that's patriarchy. And it's like it actually happens to everybody, man. My favorite is mansplaining. Mansplaining? Oh yeah, we're doing that now. My favorite is manspreading, as you will know. I'm famously a manspreader and I have my profile on Twitter is manspreading to the maximum. Is that what you're doing in your profile? Oh yeah. You're manspreading? It's actually funny. I was doing the thing in London last October. We were doing some talks and I was actually explaining. I had one video I did where I didn't even realize it and I was manspreading like out of control. I mean it was like embarrassingly bad. I looked at it the first time I saw the video and I'm like... But manspreading only matters if you're on a subway or a bus and someone's next to you and you're taking up too much. That's the main thing. That's what the problem is with it. Right, but they see the action at all. You gotta train it out of people. So anyway, in London I was very... I was actually distractedly mindful not to manspread and so I was telling the story to the crowd and I manspread to demonstrate what I meant by manspread. I just did it again. And somebody snapped a picture of it while I was doing it and sent it to me and I'm like, that's my profile picture. So I'm in a jacket and a tie and I'm manspreading, laughing or whatever. I feel like I read this. I don't know if I did or not. That men, they're natural the way their legs sit in their hips. It's natural for their legs to splay out. Whereas with women their hips are built differently. That's probably true. Can you find that out? We also have testicles. I don't know how you would Google that. Yeah, but... I mean, I think you do. I know I do. I definitely do. Just checking. How dare you. But you can't... I'd rather stand up. I mean, if I'm jamming people in like that, I don't mind standing. Yeah, totally. Yeah, unless it's a long ass flight or a long ass train ride, but I can keep my legs together. No, I hear you. I'm totally with you. But I think it's a natural thing. I think it makes sense. It's spread out. And like, I mean, you're fit. I actually have bizarrely large legs and so it's actually very difficult for me to squeeze my legs together. Here it goes. The overall width of the pelvis is relatively greater in females and the angle of the femoral neck is more acute. These factors could play a role in making a position of sitting with the knees close together less comfortable in men. Aha, you fucks. I suspect most men would suggest the reason for adopting the more spread posture in sitting would be the avoidance of testicular compression from the thigh muscles. The pelvic rotation goes some way to improve compression in both aspects. It's funny the way they say it that way. That's right. They have to say testicular compression. Well, that's because it's from masculine science. It's masculineist, white, Western science making this claim. And it's from the independent. But when you have big legs, man, it's like, you know, if I know I'm going to have to walk a long distance, I have to wear the right underwear, I'm going to get chafed on my thighs. Yes, me too. You get big thighs. So there's a science behind man's presence. It's like I need those like Chuck Norris drop crotch jeans that he had those when he used to do his kicks. Dude, those are the best. Do you remember those? I had a pair of those. Hell yeah. Chuck Norris action jeans. Action jeans, that's right. Yes, I had those. Were you doing karate? You know, you were doing taekwondo, right? Yeah, I did like sport karate back then. Yeah, those were the pants to have that. That's right. Everybody had that stuff. Yeah, those, the people with large thighs, man, that's what boxer briefs were invented for. That's right. I can't wear regular shorts. Like if I just wear shorts and boxer briefs, it'll chew my legs up. That's right. If I work out. It kills me. Yeah. And large ladies have that issue too. Right. They're overweight. I think that is a problem of body blueprinting. And it's actually a sign that fat, phobic society hasn't designed all clothing around that problem. They didn't design clothing with fat on their mind. Those in. Okay.