#2054 - Elon Musk

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7 months ago

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Elon Musk

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Elon Musk is a business magnate, designer, and engineer. His portfolio of businesses include Tesla, Inc., SpaceX, Neuralink, X, and many others. https://twitter.com/elonmusk

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Timestamps

10:58Joe hits Cyber Truck with arrow
38:00Joe loves sardines + the boys order pizza

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I went from pineapple and anchovies sounds disgusting to the pizza man arriving with my order. Should have just lived vicariously through Joe and Elon… maybe just not made right but probably just should have stood my ground like Jamie

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The audio-video are out of sync. Can I anyhow download this to fix that issue?

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Thisjustin

6mo ago

The most ridiculous part of this off-the-wall podcast was Joe and Elon agreeing that Buco de Beppo is a good restaurant.

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theskillwithin

7mo ago

What are their costumes as btw?

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Bee2wenty1ne

7mo ago

I was so excited to listen to this but DUDE! what a let down! I mean there was some good conversation but the Joe smacking his mouth while chewing and the mediocre cyber truck bs wasn’t very interesting at all

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elon's laugh when joe was talking about eating sardines was hilarious and very strange

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Texas

7mo ago

Wow, this is the first time I have heard Joe do a commercial break.

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Cheers, sir. Happy Halloween. Thanks for doing this. Appreciate it. You're welcome. Thanks for rolling up in this hybrid truck, too. I got a chance to look at it in the factory, but that was almost a year and a half ago or so. Was it? It was a while ago. Yeah, a year ago, I guess. Yeah, at least a year. At least a year. And it's different in real life. Like, you see it in person. Images are just, we were talking about it outside. You just can't contextualize them. Yes. It looks so odd. You have to see it in the flesh. It looks like computer graphics in reality. Yeah, it's the coolest-looking fucking production car that's ever been made. It's world-proof, literally. Literally, yeah. One of the videos we're going to show is just going all full El Capone. Just like El Capone showed up and emptied the entire magazine of a Tommy gun into the side of the car. The only thing that's not bulletproof is the glass. The glass is optionally bulletproof. Oh, it is optional? Well, you can make anything bulletproof if you want, but the glass has to be very thick for it to be bulletproof, so it can't go up and down. So if you want to fix glass... Then how do you order drive-through? Yeah, exactly. That's a problem. You got to pull ahead, open the door, get out. But it's okay. You can just duck. Yeah, you can just duck. How far away are you from full delivering them to people? Has anybody gotten them yet? We planted our first deliveries next month. Oh, wow. So now it's just testing and fucking around? The hard part, by far, is manufacturing, not designing the car. So there's just not really a movie about that, but there should be. So in the sort of the movies will always be about the sort of inventor who invented the car, and then the job is done. That's all invented the object, now the job is done. This is not true. That's the easy part. The hard part is manufacturing, by far. Why is it so much harder than making an individual model? Well, in order to make it affordable, you have to make it at volume. So you've got to make everything at high rate consistently. If you tour the production line, you'd have a sense for it. You've got to have all of the casting machines, all of the staffing machines, as the case may be, the glass machines, the wheels, the tires, everything required from the motor, the battery cells, all of the constituents of the battery cells, all of the silicon that goes in there with the chips. The manufacturing is somewhere between 100 and 1,000 times harder than making a prototype. Whoa. And then if you want to say, like, you want to get from, once you reach volume manufacturing, which is insanely difficult, then you want to make the car affordable, it's harder to, say, reduce the cost of the car by 20% than it is to get to volume production in the first place. So I really cannot emphasize enough how hard production is relative to design. I'm not saying design is trivial, because you have to have taste and you have to know what to make. If you don't have a taste and judgment, then your prototype will be bad. But it is, it is trivial really to churn out prototypes, and it is extremely difficult to build a factory. And how much more difficult is it to make this, considering the body's made out of steel? It's a... Very difficult. The difficulty of manufacturing is proportionate to the amount of new technology that you have in a car or in the product. In this case, there's a lot of new technology. The production line will move as fast as the slowest and least lucky and most foolish part of the entire production line. And you could say to first approximation, there are 10,000 things that have to go right, at least for production to work. So if you have 9,999 things that are working and one that isn't, that sets your production rate. But by far the hard part, in fact, the really... The amazing thing about automobiles was not so much the invention of the automobile, but the invention of the factory, the mass manufacturing. And for that, Henry Ford deserves a tremendous amount of credit. He was an ex-level genius. And in fact, Ford is really responsible for the entire mass manufacturing industry because he actually found a Cadillac, which was the heart of General Motors. Then he got kicked out, then started Ford. Yeah, and then everyone just copied him. Do you know he made one of his first cars out of hemp? Well... He used hemp fiber for the panels. Okay. Yeah, it's this fascinating video of him bang on it with a hammer. Because hemp is bizarrely durable when it's compressed and when they take the fibers, and I don't know what kind of epoxy they use or something to put it all together. But what it makes, the actual physical form of it, it's insanely light. Like fiberglass light, but very, very durable. See if you can find the video. It's kind of crazy. Henry Ford is banging on, I think it was the hood of it, with a hammer. There it is. So this was like, look at that. Isn't that crazy? Yeah, that's well. I don't know why they stopped making them out of that. That was from 1941. Hmm. How much does the Cybertruck weigh? It depends on configuration, but it's about, I don't know, 7,000 pounds. Whoa. 60, there's different versions, but 6,000, 6,000, 7,000 pounds. It's like similar to, like it's a heavy truck. Like a Ford F250 or something like that. Yeah. And it, because of all of the metal and the weight and everything like that, but with the engines that you have, the zero to 60 is pretty bizarre, right? It's like three, five or something like that? Well, let me get the zero to 60 below three seconds. Below three? Yes. Wow. For the beast mode version. So we've got a beast mode version. So there's, well, I don't want to give it all away right now, but there are three demonstrations. One of them, people are aware of, which is emptying a Tommy gun into the side of the car, a shotgun, 45 and a 9mm, and no penetrations. Wow. And that's, it comes that way from the factory. Can I try it with an arrow? Yeah, it'll be fine. You think so? I mean, a crossbow might. I have a 90 pound compound bow that shoots 520 grain arrows at 300 feet per second. With a razor sharp broad head. We're gonna try it right now if you want. I wish I had it with me. Is it at your house or something? Yeah. Should we send someone to go get it? We could do the demo tonight. That would be interesting. I'll, maybe I'll drive back with an arrow sticking out of my car. I bet I could get it in there. Okay, I'll bet you can't. Really? Yeah, I'll bet you don't. Damn. I was like, damn. I think if you have a crossbow that's with enough force, a crossbow might get. The thing about a crossbow is the bolt, even though it's very fast, it's not gonna be nearly as heavy. You won't have as many grains. You can make a heavy crossbow bolt. You could. Yeah, but generally, crossbow bolts are considerably lighter. They're much smaller. You know, and they're much faster. They're moving at like 400, 500 feet per second. Easy. Yeah, I mean, the thing that matters is kind of the energy per unit area. So interesting, like a nine-mole or a 45, which is basically sort of a 10-mole, the 45 is, they're roughly the same, but the 45 actually is slightly worse penetration than a nine-mole. You know what I just realized? I do have some broadheads. I do have some broadheads and I have a less powerful bow. I have an 80-pound bow back there. I think we should do it. Absolutely. Okay, what do you wanna do right now? Yeah, I can do it right now. Okay, let's do it right now. Okay, let's do it. Ha ha ha ha ha. Sick. We'll wrap up. This could be funny. Well, I'm just like, why does he have an arrow sticking out of his car? This show is sponsored by BetterHelp. It's a really healthy, good thing to talk about what you're going through with people. The good and the bad. Don't keep it all bottled up. And sometimes that can be friends or family, but it also helps to talk to pros. And that's where BetterHelp comes in. It's therapy that's totally online, which makes it so easy to get started. You just fill out a few quick questions and they match you with someone to talk to. And if you don't get the right match at first, you can switch therapists at any time for free. It's easy, it's flexible, it's wherever you are. Seriously, it's a great thing to try. Get a break from your thoughts with BetterHelp. Visit betterhelp.com slash JRE today to get 10% off your first month. That's betterhelp, H-E-L-P dot com slash J-R-E. I have a different project. I think you can do better. I can bring it back. Let's see. You start with the arrow cut back in. I mean, just be aware of ricochets. I like it. You might want to do it with a slight angle. You know what I mean? Look at that. There it is. Favorite one. Look at that scratch. Blue the arrow part. Flatten the tip of the arrow. Look at the tip of the broadhead. That's impressive. Hey cutie. Thank you. Well now we know. So we just shot an arrow into it and it barely scratched it. Barely scratched it. It was probably moving 275 feet a second. That was a 525 grain-ish arrow with, yeah, even more than that because it had the 125 grain head. So that was 545 grains. That's impressive. Yeah. Very impressive. It just destroyed the broadhead. Broadhead flattened at the tip and then the arrow blew apart. Yeah. Amazing. Yeah. Like I said, we have a cool video we'll show at the handover event next month which is emptying an entire magazine of Tommy Gunn which is on the order of 50 rounds. You're just going full Al Capone like on the side of the car. Shotgun, 9-Mold, 45. And you built it like this just for fun. Essentially. Well, I mean. Because it's cooler? I mean. Because you can? You know, trucks are supposed to be tough, right? Yeah. Is your truck bulletproof? No, mine is definitely not. Exactly. And if I shot mine with my bow, it'd go right through it. 100%. 100%. So if you shoot any normal car, unlike in the movies where people hide behind car doors, a car door is basically a very thin, mild steel. So if you shoot a gun at it through like a regular truck, it'll go through both doors. So, you can't hide behind a car door like they do in the movies. You know, way back in the day, dating myself with the A-Team where they would be like bullets flying everywhere and they'd be hiding behind the car door. Right. That doesn't work. But it does in a cyber truck. Was there ever a- There's this best in apocalyptic technology. Yeah, well. Oh, you don't know. It's an amazing car to have in the apocalypse. Yeah, exactly. Doesn't it also, does it still do this thing where the ride height, range, and there's also no regular drive train. So there's no axles that are the impediment to going over rocks and things like that. Yeah, normally in other vehicles, a gasoline or diesel vehicle, you've got the differential, which hangs down low between the rear wheels. So you're like, look under a truck, there's almost always a differential there that's hanging down pretty low. So if you hit the diff on a rock, you'll break it. Yeah. There's no, at the bottom of the cyber truck, it's completely flat and has the best clear height of any vehicle. How far away are we, if it's ever gonna happen at all, from having a vehicle that can operate entirely on solar? Well, you've got a surface area thing. So it's about a kilowatt per square meter, normal to the sun, roughly. So you just, it really depends on what kind of mileage. You don't have enough surface area to keep the car going just from the car surface area. But if you had something that folded out, you could make it self-sustaining. Something that folded out, so you could park it and then leave it on. Yeah, you'd have to unfold like the starting satellites do, where you unfold the solar panels. You just need more surface area. Is there any potential for an advancement in technology that would make a smaller area much better at conducting sun, nothing? No, it's a kilowatt per square meter. That's what you're gonna get when the sun, if you're normal to the sun, so at 90 degrees to the sun. And there's nothing that could accelerate that or no? That's just literally the solar energy. That's just it. Yeah, so then you multiply your efficiency by that. So if your commercial panels, like maybe 25% efficient, if they're a good one, so you get like 250 watts per square meter. There was one car, what was it like a Fisker that was using a solar panel that claimed that it was operating like the electronics, like it could start the radio? Yeah, yeah. I mean, you can definitely, it's just don't have enough surface area for it. Like, but you can like certainly, you could run a house with solar, with the solar roof, and the Tesla solar roof, you can run a house. But it's never gonna get to a point where you can just have a car that's made out of solar panels and it could drive around, it could never be that efficient. Correct, so you do not have enough surface area. What research or what breakthroughs have been made in terms of battery technology? Like how far away are we from having batteries that are far more efficient and last far longer? I know there's some talk of like sodium based batteries. The battery range is not a problem at this point. I mean, the Model S will go 400 miles, Model Y will do over 300 miles. So, you know, that's more than most people need. So, yeah. But are we, I mean, how far away are we from making batteries that are more efficient? Like we obviously have at least the limit of technology. This is not really a constraint. The point at which you've got a car that can do, let's say even at highway speeds 250 miles, then, or let's say 240 miles at 80 miles an hour. Now you're driving for three hours straight. And so if you start a trip at say 9 a.m. By noon you wanna stop for lunch, go to the restroom, grab a coffee. By the time you come back your car is charged. How long does it take to fully charge? Yeah, like, that happen hour? Well, you don't wanna, it's a little, the people will get used to it because it's a little different. You know, like for a gasoline car, you'd wanna fill it up. For an electric car, you'd wanna actually go very close to zero. And the car can calculate how much range it has with precision. So if you, if you pull up, say enter a road trip in a Tesla, it'll calculate all of the super charges along the way, where you stop, how much you should charge. And just let the computer do its thing and it'll work well. So you actually wanna charge to about 80% and then run it down all the way to 10%, or less. Do you wanna do that on everyday use as well or just with long trips? No, just long trips. If you're trying to minimize the amount of time you stop when charging. So let's say you wanna stop for 20, 30 minutes, then you really, it's a little counterintuitive because for a gasoline car, you would fill it up. For a battery, the charge state tapers off as you get above 80%. You can think of it like the, I think the right analogy here is cars in a parking lot. So the lithium ions are trying to find a parking space as they move across from one side of the battery to the other side from cathode, anode. I mean, they're sort of, just these ions are just bouncing around looking for a parking space. So when the parking lot's empty, they could zip right in there and find a spot, it's easy. As the parking lot gets full, just like trying to find a parking space at a mall, you have to hunt around for a spot. And that's how, that's basically what's going on, is the ions looking for a parking spot. So as the battery gets closer to full, it's harder and harder to find a spot. They have to bounce around more. So it takes longer to get from 80 to 100? Correct. Getting from 80 to 100, it takes about as much time as getting from zero to 80. Just think of the ions got to find a parking spot. Oh. And just like if you're in a mall and it's busy, then it takes longer to find a parking spot than if it's empty. So essentially you're satisfied with the technology that's available right now in terms of like the amount of mileage that you get out of it and things along those lines. Yeah, range is not an issue. Cost is more of an issue. So just need to make the car affordable, a long range car needs to be affordable. When you fully roll out, how many of those things, how many Cybertrucks can you guys make a month? We're aiming to make about 200,000 a year at volume production. Wow. Maybe a little more. But I just can't emphasize enough that manufacturing is much, much harder than the initial design. You know, you can, the Cybertrucks easy design, I'm not trying to trivialize design. It's just what I'm trying to do is to emphasize the difficulty of manufacturing, which is not understood by the public because there's no movie about it. So there's lots of movies about the sort of wild adventure in the garage, but I'm not aware of any movie about manufacturing. Have you ever heard of a movie about manufacturing? I can't remember any, Jamie, any movie about manufacturing? It's one coming in my brain, but I don't think that's what it's even about. So I have no idea. What is that? Michael Keaton was making some cars in somewhere. I thought I was gonna look it up on you. I mean, it's Tommy boy. Yeah, Tommy boy's the only one. That's about as good as a car. It's a great movie. It's a great movie. That might be the only one. That's interesting that it's such an immense part of American culture and also the decline of some American cities. I mean, it's famously documented in Roger and Me, which is a great documentary where he just talks about how Flint got destroyed when they pulled out the car manufacturing. Yeah, yeah. I mean, there's a reason why generally politicians really try very hard to get a factory in their area is because it's a massive generator of jobs. And for every factory job, there's like five, roughly five support jobs. So it's like teachers, electricians, plumbers, lawyers, accountants, restaurants. So manufacturing is kind of like a nucleus from which many jobs spring. That's why it's generally, a governor's and prime ministers and presidents will try so hard to get a factory in their country or region. When you decided to build the gigafactory and when you decided, well, just even when you decided to get involved with Tesla, did you have any idea of how difficult this would be? Did you have a preconceived notion? I thought it would be very difficult. I thought our probability of success was less than 10%. Whoa. Yeah, I mean, it would be foolish to think anything else other than that. Even at this point, the only car companies that have not gone bankrupt are Ford and Tesla, American car companies. You know, General Motors went bankrupt and Chrysler went bankrupt in 2009. There's some chance they'll go bankrupt again. Ford and Tesla barely made it. It was incredibly difficult to keep Tesla alive when General Motors and Chrysler were going bankrupt. Because manufacturing is the actual hard thing. Not that, by far, the hard thing. I just can't upsize that enough and I hope somebody makes a movie about that. Maybe they should make a movie about Tesla. Sure. Why not? Perfect. Who would you want to play you? I don't care. How about David Spade? Anyone. I don't care. I don't care if anyone plays me. But I do think that this- I just went back to Tommy Boy. Yeah, I don't know who he rocks. So, Jim Folly is the CEO of Ford and he's Chris Folly's cousin. No way. Yes. Wow. That's crazy. That's crazy. And they look, I mean, they look related. Yeah, there should be a movie. You gotta get someone good that doesn't fuck it up. Someone doesn't. Well, I mean, the thing is, writers are just disconnected from manufacturing. They just never see it. So. And I guess you have to try to create some narrative arc. I mean, there are some shows like How It's Made type of thing. But they're pretty niche. But I know some of them have broken record here, but I can't emphasize enough that it is insanely difficult to manufacture. Makes sense. Yeah. Well, it particularly makes sense when something that novel, something is, but ultimately cool as fuck. Yeah. What has it been like, you've owned X for a year now? Oh yeah. Do you ever wake up in the middle of the night and have a dream that you didn't do it? And your life is infinitely easier? Well, it's certainly a recipe for trouble, I suppose, or contention. What was it ultimately that led you to make the decision to do it? I mean, this is gonna sound somewhat melodramatic, but I was worried about that it was having a corrosive effect on civilization. That it was just having a bad impact. And I think part of it is that it's where it was located, which is downtown San Francisco. And while I think San Francisco is a beautiful city and which should really fight hard to kind of right the ship of San Francisco, if you walked around downtown San Francisco, right near the X, FK, Twitter headquarters, it's a zombie apocalypse. I mean, it's rough. Have you been in that area? Not lately, no. I've heard. It's crazy. I've heard it's crazy. I've heard you really can't believe it until you actually go there. You can't believe it until you go there. So now you have to say, well, what philosophy led to that outcome? And that philosophy was being piped to Earth. So, you know, a philosophy that would be ordinarily quite niche and geographically constrained, so that sort of the fallout area would be limited, was effectively given an information, a weapon. An information technology weapon to propagate what is essentially a mind virus to the rest of Earth. And the outcome of that mind virus is very clear if you walk around the streets of downtown San Francisco. It is the end of civilization. And it's not just propagating the mind virus, but suppressing any opposing viewpoints. Yes. Well, in order for the virus to propagate, it must suppress opposing viewpoints. Because it doesn't stand up to scrutiny. Correct. Yeah. I mean, you've felt the virus. Yeah. Yeah, people will try to cancel you so many times. Yeah, it's fascinating. Yeah. Now, I don't think you're melodramatic at all. I think it's a, I mean, I don't wanna be melodramatic, but it's almost like a death cult. It's a death cult. No, no, that is exactly right. It's essentially the extinctionists. Like it's in the limit, it is that they're propagating the extinction of humanity and civilization. And there's some people who are, like most of the time it's implicit. They don't, but sometimes it's explicit. Like there was a guy on the front page of the New York Times who literally has the thing called the extinctionist movement. And he was quoted on the front page of the New York Times as saying, there are eight billion people in the world, but it would be better if there were none. And I'm like, well buddy, you can start with yourself. Yeah. Does he have friends? That's what always fascinates me. Well, here he is. That guy. He looks like you've not long for this earth. I mean, he doesn't, he's not young. Voluntary human extinction movement, that's hilarious, spent death. I'd like to party with that dude. I would just like to like, yeah. That's an explicit version of the death cult. Maybe you live long and die out. I mean, it's not, the extinction is a word he uses. Yes. No, I mean, it's not a, it's literally a self description. Did they cover him glowing? That death cult was in charge of social media. And still largely is at Google and Facebook, by the way. Yeah. So I'm like, I'm not in favor of human extinction. They are and they can go to hell. Well, that guy is. Yeah, he can go to hell. That guy seems silly. I would like to hang out with him though. I would like to find out what makes him tick. I bet that guy is fascinating. This episode is brought to you by DraftKings. We're more than halfway through the NFL season, but DraftKings Sportsbook is still pumping out unbeatable offers every single game. New customers can bet just five bucks on anything to get $200 instantly in bonus bets. DraftKings isn't stopping there. All customers can take advantage of a sweetener offer every game day. Get in on the football action with DraftKings Sportsbook, an official sports betting partner of the NFL. 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I'm a carer of, I'm pro environment, but in the limit, if you take environmentalism to an extreme, you start to view humanity as a plague on the surface of the earth, like a mold or something. Right. But this is actually false. The earth could take probably 10 times the current civilization. The population could be, you could 10X the population without destroying the northern forest. So the environmental movement, and I'm an environmentalist, has gone too far. They've gone way too far. If you start thinking that humans are bad, then the natural conclusion is humans should die out. Now I'm headed to an AI safety, international sort of AI safety conference later tonight, leaving in about three hours. And I don't know, I meet with the British prime minister and a number of other people. So you have to say like, how could AI go wrong? Well, if AI gets programmed by the extinctionists, its utility function will be the extinction of humanity. They won't even think it's bad like that guy. They won't even think it's bad like that guy. Yeah. There's a lot of decisions that AI would make that would be very similar to eugenics. I mean, there would be some radical changes in what people are allowed to and not allowed to do that allow them to survive that may be detrimental in terms of like pollution and things like that, but it may be the only solution they have in their area. I mean, maybe AI would come up with some sort of a different structure in terms of how they get power and resources, but. There's no shortage of power. Like we talked about solar powerful cars. The issue is that cars just have a very low surface area, but you could actually power the entire United States with a hundred miles by a hundred miles of solar. Really? Yes. So you can just pick some dead spot that you fly over. Of which they have plenty. Cover that sucker up with solar panels and charge the whole country. Absolutely. 24 seven. We need batteries, but yes. Yeah. Wow. Yeah, it's not hard. I mean, meaning it's like, it's very feasible. In fact, I mean, the sun is converting over 4 million tons of mass to energy every second. And it's no maintenance. That thing just works. That we have a giant fusion reactor in the sky. That is the sun. In fact, people like, someone's like, well, what about in a radiation? I'm like, the sun is literally a nuclear reactor in the sky. Yeah. Are you scared to go in daylight? Rocks of radiation. Yes. The radiation risk is greatly overestimated. I always wonder why radiation is always bad in real life, but always awesome in comic books. Yeah, exactly. Like no one can see me powers. And suddenly you have spider abilities. Get hit with gamma rays from the heart. If you're radioactive cockroach, you'd be like the cockroach man. Yeah, you can be one of the X men. Yeah. Yeah. I think the problem is like most people just don't understand what radiation is. And so it just sounds like a mysterious, invisible death ray. Well, it's almost like drugs. Like we think of it, we put a blanket over it. Like it's all one thing. Radiation is Chernobyl. You know? Right. I mean, the thing is you can actually tour Chernobyl right now. Can you really? You can actually go to where the melt holes. Well, I mean there's a war zone. Close enough. But apart from that, the issue is more getting shot than it is. You don't have a radiation risk. I mean, the problem is like I think when people don't understand what radiation is, they just can't see it, they can't feel it. They think, well, I could just die at any moment, like from a magic death ray. Right. You know, I've had people say like, oh, the radiation from their phone is gonna hurt them or they're scared of the microwave. I'm like, when you say radiation, do you mean particles or photons? And if you mean photons, what wavelength? And then like, I don't know what you mean. They don't know anything about that. Right. They're afraid of the term. But it's because of Three Mile Island and Fukushima. We've been told. Yeah, but nobody died of radiation from Fukushima. Not one person. True. In fact, but I was asked by people in California, like when Fukushima happened, whether the radiation would get to California. I'm like, that's the dumbest thing I've ever heard. And so actually to help support Japan, I flew to Fukushima and ate locally grown vegetables on TV. And I'm still alive. I have a friend, he's very smart, but he won't eat fish out of the Pacific because he's worried about the radiation from Fukushima. Yeah, that's irrational. There is no physics substance to that, I would say, at all. Not even slightly. I'm gonna send him this clip. Yes. Go back to the sushi place, bro. You should be, okay, if you eat too much tuna, you're gonna have mercury. Yes, correct. Mercury poisoning from tuna is a real thing. You can get arsenic from sardines too. I found that out the hard way. Really? Yeah. Ate too many sardines? Yeah, I got my blood work done and the doctor says you have arsenic in your blood. And I go, is someone poisoning me? He goes, it's very low level. He's like, is your girlfriend angry at you? He has been, it's a dreary just like that. And I said, yeah, he'd like three cans of sardines a night. That's a lot of sardines, man. I love sardines. Oh yeah, it's the pretty. I love them. You love sardines. I've always loved sardines. Okay. I love them. But turns out, you can't eat too much of it because they're not good for you. Okay. I mean, a little sardines once in a while, but not three cans a night. Well, for me, it's like, I come home late from the comedy club and I want something easy to eat. I don't wanna stop. I just ask food, so I open up a few cans of sardines. I don't know, watch a little TV, eat a few cans of sardines. I'll shoot it every night. And then I stopped doing it and I got my blood worked on a couple months later, it was gone. Yeah. So too many sardines. I think anchovies really, really pep up a Caesar salad. Yeah, they do. I'm a fan. I'm a fan. I'm a fan of anchovies as well. One of my favorite pizzas ever is pineapple and anchovy. Double pineapple, double anchovies. It's amazing. It's sweet and the salty, and then you get the tomato sauce and the cheese. It's my favorite pizza. It's very good. I mean, as a kid, I was very much against wine pizza. And as an adult, I like it. Hawaiian's good, but I'm telling you, anchovies and pineapple is the bomb diggity. That's the bomb diggity. I'll give it a shot. That's the bomb diggity. So wait, can we order some right now? Is that feasible? I bet we could. Let's try it. That'd be sick. Yeah. Have Jeff order a very large pizza with double pineapple, double anchovies. Great, fantastic, I'm hungry. Let's fucking go. Yes, L.G. Let's fucking go. We're fighting. No time like the present. Enjoy life. Well, there's gotta be a good spot around here. Tell them it's fine, a good spot, and tell them it's for us. They'll cook it up. If they won't, if they won't. Don't jizz on the pizza, all right? Tell them we'll mention their name. Tell them we'll mention their name on the podcast. Don't tell them it's us. Yeah. Tell them it's us, fuck it. If they're gonna close, tell them we'll mention their name. What is this salty sauce that's so mysterious? Oh no. Right, don't tell them it's us. Good call. Yeah, don't tell them it's us. Make sure you don't buy it from any label. What is this salty tangy substance on there? Don't buy it from East Austin. Don't buy it from anyone who still wears a mask. There's a lot of them out there. There's a lot of them out there. They're still masked up. It's wild. Yeah, once in a while I see someone firing at me like, On the street? Yeah. I saw a guy on the street the other day just walking around with a mask on. I'm like, okay buddy, you look like you're about 28 years old. Yeah. I think you're gonna be okay. Be okay, yeah. You're probably not gonna be okay breathing that fucking same air in that mask and all the bacteria you're spitting out. Yeah. It's attaching to that cloth. Yeah, masks are not like some magic health shield. I mean, there are times where masks are warranted like if a surgeon is operating on you or whatever, then you don't want the surgeon spitting in your wound, you know. Of course. But most of the time a mask is not good for you. Yeah, if you can breathe out of it, that means you're breathing in. That means you're also exhaling. So like how much is it filtering? Like what is it? Particles? I'd say like a mask is much like sort of a shield in battle in that, you know, it'll help protect you a little bit from arrows and stuff, but it doesn't make you arrow proof. We were just talking about shooting arrows and stuff. Right. I mean, at times when masks are warranted, but most of the time it's actually counterproductive. Well, that was one of the things about the old Twitter was the propaganda and the adherence to whatever the CDC was saying and the dismissing of legitimate scientists, guys like Jay Bhattachara from Stanford and legit guys. And they were suppressing them and even banning them. And they banned Alex Berenson. I mean, it was wild. They banned Alex for essentially reading peer reviewed papers. Yeah. I mean, all Twitter was basically an arm of the government. Yeah. So. Was that shocking? Like what was that like? Is that, to me, that was the most bizarre was the Twitter files. When you let Schellenberg and Matt Taibbi and all those guys get in the Twitter, in the response where Matt Taibbi gets audited. Which is just wild. I mean, it's just so blatant and so in your face. Yeah, it's weird. No, I mean, the reader, yeah, the reader which, and by the way, Jack didn't really know this, but the reader which Twitter was simply an arm of the government was not well understood by the public. And it was, there was no, it was whatever the official go, I mean, it was like Pravda, basically. You know, it's a state publication is the way to think of all Twitter. It was a state publication. And was the justification from their perspective that they are progressive liberals, they have the right intentions. It's important that they stay in power, the progressive liberals stay in government and power because this is their. There was basically oppression of any views that would even, I would say, be considered middle of the road. But certainly anything on the right. I'm not talking about like far right, I'm just talking mildly right. The people, like Republicans were suppressed at 10 times the rate of Democrats. Now that's because old Twitter was fundamentally controlled by the far left. It was like completely controlled by the far left. And that's why I say like, San Francisco Berkeley is a niche ideology. It's hard to say like, is there a place that's more far left than San Francisco Berkeley? Maybe Portland. Maybe Portland, but it's like, it's a. Right there. Yeah, it's those two places are the most far left places in America. Yes. So from their standpoint, everything is to the right. Including moderates. Right, right. So, but now, if you internalize a far left position, everything seems wrong to you that is not far left. Right. And so they naturally oppressed anything that didn't agree with their views. That's why I say that it was an accidental far left information weapon. So, because it's like Silicon Valley attracts the smartest engineers, the smartest sort of technologists and programmers from around the world. They created an information weapon that was then harnessed by the far left. Who could not themselves create the weapon, but happened to be co-located where the technologists were. Mm, it happened to be aligned politically with the people that possessed it. The technologists generally are moderate, maybe moderate left, but they're not far left. That's why I say San Francisco Berkeley, it doesn't even extend to South San Francisco, or even to Palo Alto. So, SF Berkeley is the most far left, perhaps, you know, in a competition with Portland, but I'd say SF Berkeley is more far left even than Portland. That like literally in America, we're talking about an area that's maybe a 10 mile radius. And so normally the effects, the negative effects of a far left ideology that is, would be geographically limited to a 10 mile radius. That's like not, it's small, like, so any bad effects of that ideology would be geographically constrained under normal circumstances and have been in the past. But when you have basically a technological megaphone, which was Twitter and social media in general, suddenly the far left are handed a megaphone to earth, an incredibly powerful technology weapon that they themselves could not create, but they happen to be co-located with the technologists who created it by accident. Is it shocking that more people don't understand how dangerous that is? I think some people understand. Some people do. Some people understand. So, I mean, from the standpoint of some people who used to be at Twitter, the people were like, well, it's a big shift to the right. That is correct. It is a shift to the right because everything is to the right if you're far left. Everything is to the right. But how many far left people have actually been suspended or banned from Twitter now X, zero? So it's really just moved to the center, but from the perspective of the far left, it has moved to the right. It's like everything's relative. The difference in moderation. I should say it propagated that far left philosophy, not just to America, but to everywhere on earth. Right. Yeah. Yeah. And with the same level of suppression in other countries as well? Yes. But the Taliban is on Twitter, right? I always think of like, hey, Mr. Taliban, tell me about it. I mean, there's definitely some people on Twitter that are... They like coming and wanting to go. Yeah. So the point is, from my standpoint, is that X, FK, Twitter should, should represent the sort of collective consciousness of humanity. So now that means that there are gonna be views on there that you don't like or disagree with. But that's humanity. So are you gonna exclude them or not? Now, I mean, if somebody breaks the law, then the account is suspended. I mean, if they actively advocate murder, then the account is suspended. We do have what we call like the kind of United Nations exclusion rule, which is that you can have, say, the Ayatollah, who, you know, would prefer that Israel didn't exist, for example. But he's allowed to go to the UN building in New York. And in fact, generally, officials from Iran do in fact go to the UN building in New York, even though they are a heavily sanctioned country. So I think that there's merit to having, just like there's some merit to the UN, one can disagree with the UN, and I think we shouldn't have a world government that we bow down to. But in fact, that's risky for civilization. But I think you do wanna have the leaders of countries represented on social media. You wanna hear what they have to say, even if what they say is terrible. I think that is true across the board. And I think one of the things you just said that's very important is that's humanity. And I think it's important that a social media platform, especially the biggest one, represents humanity. So we understand what we're talking about, because we have this distorted idea of what people think and want and need, because everyone only exists inside this ideological bubble, and anything outside of that bubble gets censored, then that literally changes the tone of the entire country. Changes what people think is okay and not okay, makes people feel differently. It's not humanity, it's different. It's a very forced version of humanity. Yes, absolutely. So the whole point of free speech, free speech is only relevant. The First Amendment is only relevant if you allow people you don't like to say things you don't like. Because if you like it, you don't need a First Amendment. So the whole point of free speech is that, frankly, even people you hate say things you hate, because if people you hate can say things that you hate, that means that they can't stop you from saying what you wanna say, which is very, very important. Right, but the problem with Twitter was it was not the case. Correct. It was people that you hate couldn't say. Anyone they didn't like, they censored. Yeah. Or what's called deamplify. Well, not just deamplify, but under the behest of the government would suppress real news, which was very bizarre. Yes. So they were very aware of something being accurate, and they still suppressed it, because the government wanted them to suppress it. In my view, there have been severe First Amendment violations by multiple government agencies, and there should be repercussions for that. And is it, do different laws apply because it's a privately owned social media company? I mean, what laws do apply in terms of, when you're looking at it, one of the arguments that the leftists would use is it's a private company, they could do whatever they want. Yeah, it's funny that when the shoes on the other foot, they now say the private company can't do whatever it wants. Well, yeah, now they're upset. No, that's like, but the government itself is not allowed to censor speech. But in my view, the government de facto did censor speech, and there should at least be a case where that is heard by the public. Because if the government severely coerces a platform, a sort of coerces the press, then I think that should be a First Amendment violation. Well, they can't do it with other media forms, right? They're not allowed to do it with any other... Right, if they're not allowed to do that with a newspaper, they're getting trouble. Right. Well, good day. That's the question. You didn't know about the federal government, you didn't know about the intelligence agencies inside of Twitter until we found out. Do you think that this is ubiquitous? It's absolutely all the social media companies. In fact, right now, ex- or if you know, Pomellino's Twitter is the only one that is not counteracting to the government. It's the only one. There isn't... All the others just do exactly what the government wants. That is wild. Yes. What I was getting at, do you think that that's everywhere? Yes. Do you think that that's CNN? Do you think that that's the New York Times? Do you think that that's the Washington Post? Because if they were going to infiltrate media, if they were going to infiltrate social media... I mean, it is weird the degree to which the media is in lockstep. Like, why is the media in lockstep? And why doesn't the media question the government? They used to. Right. Why don't they do that anymore? Seems weird. Something doesn't add up. What do you think? Well, there seems like there's a bunch of factors, right? I think one of the big factors is pharmaceutical drug companies allowed to advertise on television. And we're one of two countries in the world that allow that. I actually agree with pharmaceutical advertising provided it's truthful. Because there could be some drug that is helpful to someone, but obviously the claims need to be accurate. So I actually think pharmaceutical advertising, if it is accurate, I think it actually, you know, played devil's advocate here. I think pharmaceutical advertising is generally accurate. I think that's actually okay. Now, I should say that a lot of the censorship that we see is coming from, indirectly from advertisers and advertising agencies and from PR companies who want a particular viewpoint pushed or are being driven by nonprofits to push a particular... What will happen is there'll be a sort of a group of nonprofits or, you know, that push advertisers to advertise or not advertise on a particular platform. Often he has the sort of George Soros bogeyman. But I mean Soros actually, you know, he is, I believe, the top contributor to the Democratic Party. The second one was Sam McWerfried. Sam McWerfried, yeah. So, and Soros, I don't know, I mean, he had a very difficult upbringing. And I, in my opinion, he fundamentally hates humanity. That's my opinion. Really? Yeah. I mean, well, he's doing things that erode the fabric of civilization, you know, getting DA's elected who refuse to prosecute crime. That's part of the problem in San Francisco and LA and much other cities. So why would you do that? Was it humanity or is it just the United States as a whole? I mean, he's pushing things in other countries too. He's doing the same thing? Yeah. Now, George at this point is pretty old. I mean, he's not, you know, he's basically a casino at this point. But I mean, he's very smart and he's very good at arbitrage. You know, famously he shorted the British pound. That's sort of how I think he made his first money with shorting the pound. So he's good at spotting, basically arbitrage, like spotting value for money that other people don't see. So one of the things he noticed was that the value for money in local races is much higher than it is in national races. So the lowest value for money is a presidential race. Then next lowest value for money is a senate race, then a congress. But once you get to sort of city and state district attorneys, the value for money is extremely good. And Soros realized that you don't actually need to change the laws. You just need to change how they're enforced. If nobody chooses to enforce the law or the laws are differentially enforced, it's light changing the laws. That's what he figured out. But it's with this trend that people haven't pulled the brakes on this and have it reverse course. I'm pulling the brakes. Yeah. Yeah. Pulling the brakes right now. Yeah, you are. But you might be the only one. Well, I think more people should. Most people just don't want to rock the boat. Most people are looking for acceptance from society. If there's some negative press article, they're like shattered. I couldn't give it down. Go ahead. Make my day. Well, it's fascinating where if you're a high profile public figure like yourself, it's impossible to make everybody happy. So there's going to be someone who says something shitty about you. Yeah. Somehow or another when it's in print, does that mean more? Because other people are going to see this shitty thing? Well, I guess. That's where it gets odd. Because essentially an article in the New York Times is just a single person's opinion and whatever editor gets involved. It's just a lot of people will read that. Yeah. I mean, less people at least have it in the past. But I think people know that now. I mean, I have to say, I find the New York Times these days to be hard to read. Well, unfortunately, they make some grave errors. Yeah. Like that Hamas bombing the... Hamas? No. The Israeli bombing the hospital story. Chickpeas? Yes. It's delicious. I mean, that... I think you should cut off Chick-V-A exports. That'll bring them to the knees right away. What do you do? Take a chip and dip it in nothing? What we need to do is introduce them to pineapple and anchovy pizza. I hope that's coming. Is that coming? Do we have a pizza name like a company? I think so. I'll get some information. I want to make sure it's a good one though. Pizza Leone. Oh, that's legit. It's pretty close. Okay. There we go. Nice. Did they give us a timeline? It shouldn't take too long. They're not too far away and it's late. So it shouldn't fit. I would have bet 20 minutes, 30 minutes, maybe. All right. Max 40. Taking care of your health isn't always easy, but it should be simple. And that's why for the last three years, I've been drinking AG1 every day. AG1 is a foundational nutrition supplement that supports whole body health. It's simple, effective, and comprehensive. It's just one scoop mixed in water once a day, every day. 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You know, that's something like after I say I've got a lot of respect for somebody's like willing to make pizza late at night. Yeah. My hat is awful. I mean, that is like great. Absolutely. Late night food. I appreciate the fun. If you can get a really good late night meal. Yeah. Hats off. Totally. Or wigs off. I'm upset. Yeah. I'm a giant fan of very good late night food. And that's one of the things that like Los Angeles really used to have. Yeah. They had a Pacific dining cart where you can get a legit steak 24 hours a day. Really? That's great. Yeah. I don't know if it's still open in downtown LA. I believe the one at Santa Monica closed, but a Pacific dining cart in downtown LA was a legit steakhouse and you get it. We would leave the comedy store two, three in the morning, get a legit steak. That's cool. Just to open? Temporarily closed. Ah, COVID got them. COVID just took out so many restaurants. It's crazy. It's not coming back. Other websites seems to be down too. Yeah. They're not coming back. Motherfucker. COVID got 70% of the restaurants in LA at one point. Wow. Not COVID, I should say. Policies. Well, lockdowns. The mind virus. I mean, it's like just crazy. Well, that's why I moved here. One of the reasons why I moved here is we came here in May of 2020 and you could go indoors and eat in restaurants. Yeah. And my kids who were pretty young at the time, 10 and 12, they were like, we want to live here. Yeah. Because it's like they're freaked out. LA was weird. Yeah. Changed. For most of COVID, I was actually in South Texas building this Starship factory. And we're just, no mask, no nothing, just building a factory, building rockets. And then you have teams from California visit all masked up. And then freak out that we're not masks and we're like, we're still alive, man. Yeah. So. Did you lose anybody? Did anybody from your factory die of COVID? Not that I'm aware of, no. So part of it is that I kind of saw a dress rehearsal, which is that I kind of started in Wuhan. And so Tesla's got 20,000 employees in China. And so the first wave happened in China and we had nobody died or got seriously ill. And I was like, okay, well, this is, can't be that bad. And we're not relying on government statistics. We literally know who should up for work. Right. Did they bad you or not? And we had no one die and no one got seriously ill. So I'm like, well, I don't know what the big deal is. Well, there's a problem that people still want to stick to this initial narrative that they believed and that they espoused. They like, they repeated it. And so they'll still fight you on this today. People still fight you today on the merits of the lockdowns, the importance of vaccine mandates, closing schools. There's people that stated an opinion in 2020 and they still are doing mental gymnastics to try to make it seem like that was the right choice. No, it was just a panic. Yeah. And a lot of deaths got described to COVID that had nothing to do with COVID. And in fact, I'd say in the beginning, the cure is worse than the disease. Because people panic too much. And so that somebody would get diagnosed with COVID, they put them on intubated ventilator for a week and this was going to basically cook your lungs. So if you're on pure O2 under pressure with a tube stuck down your throat and under anesthetic, this is very bad for you. It's one thing if you do that for a couple of hours for an operation, but you do that for a week, it's going to roast your lungs. The air that we're breathing right now is 78% nitrogen, 1% argon, about 21% oxygen, and it's so miscellaneous. So if you ask most people, what are you breathing, they say oxygen. No, you're breathing nitrogen. Only about a fifth of it is oxygen. And this is about 1% argon. So I know quite a lot about life support systems because we make spaceships. And you have to keep people alive in a vacuum. So you've got to say, okay, what percentage of nitrogen, what percentage of oxygen you're going to do, what's the pressure going to be? And so sea level pressure is about 15 pounds per square inch. And the partial pressure of oxygen being 20% is therefore roughly three pounds per square inch of oxygen. So in a spacecraft, you want to, especially if you're in a spacesuit, you want to lower the pressure. So you want to keep the oxygen, still give people enough oxygen to function, obviously, but you want to lower the nitrogen content so that you don't have a spacesuit that's at 15 psi. Because at 15 psi, you just, you know, just pop out like a balloon. It's like hard to move. So you want to try to lower the pressure, you know, down to around, I don't know, six, seven psi, maybe even five psi. So you'd lower it to try to keep the oxygen, partial pressure of oxygen, roughly the same. So maybe around three psi and then three psi of nitrogen. So you got 50-50 mix of nitrogen and oxygen. And then you just get pretty hot into that week. I mean, in a while. I'm sweating. It's going to be sweaty and itchy. A little bit. Yeah. Can't believe people wear them all day. Yeah. So, anyway, so I know a thing or two about keeping people alive in a vacuum, you know. Right. So, you know, we designed the life support system for keeping humans alive in a vacuum, the vacuum of space, which is very difficult. So we know quite a lot about what it takes to keep people alive. So you don't want to be people, you know, 100% oxygen. It's actually for an extended period of time. This is not good for you. Well, 80% of the people they put on ventilators died. Yeah. So, in fact, I actually posted about that because I called doctors in Wuhan and said, what are the biggest mistakes that you made on the first wave? Those were early on. And they said, we put far too many people on intubated ventilators. So then I actually posted on Twitter at the time and said, hey, what I'm hearing from Wuhan is that they made a big mistake in putting people on intubated ventilators for an extended period. And that this is actually what is damaging the lungs, not COVID. It's the treatment, the cure is worse than the disease. And people yelled at me and said, I'm not a doctor. I'm like, yeah, but I do make space shifts with life support systems. What do you do? I like that. I twiddle nose. I'm like, okay, great. Rock on. Well, again, there was this very bizarre narrative that you had to believe everything that the government was telling you. You had to believe everything the CDC was telling you. And that even as time went on and we realized, hey, it looks like this came from a fucking lab. Like even as time went on, disputing that would get you banned, it would get you kicked off of YouTube. I think to this day, there's certain things you're not allowed to say in regards to the vaccine on YouTube. As I said, the only media that does not have crazy censorship at this point is X. That I'm aware of. Everyone else is censored. Spotify isn't. That's why this can have this. Daniel Lek. Oh, Daniel Lek's the man. I love that dude. And I think more companies should follow suit. I don't think it has to be this way. Fortunately for us, they're in Sweden. And Stockholm, Sweden, they have a very different perspective on all this shit. You got a syndrome. Yeah. What is wild about the nitrogen? That's mostly nitrogen from fertilizer we suck out of the air. Sorry, what do you mean? Most of the nitrogen for fertilizer we suck out of the air. Yeah, yeah. One of the, actually, the big inventions in chemistry was binding nitrogen. Nitrogen is actually fairly inert. So it's quite hard to actually pull nitrogen out of there and bind it into ammonia. Basically, the process for creating ammonia was actually a very important thing. The Haber method. Fritz Haber. Yeah. Same guy who invented Zyklon gas. But it was actually very important to bind nitrogen from the air to fertilizer. So that actually was, frankly, a lifesaving invention at scale, because you just run out of nitrogen. So pure nitrogen is a low energy state. So to try to bind it into fertilizer requires light energy to do that. It's quite tricky. So that was a very important breakthrough. Yeah, I read that 50% of the nitrogen in most people's body comes from that method. 50% of the nitrogen in most people's body that they've consumed from food. Oh, yeah, yeah. Because of fertilizer. Yeah, because of that Haber method. That might be true. It was a fundamental problem for most of the civilization, is how do you get nitrogen for the plants? The limiting factor, in fact, even in the rainforest, the nitrogen is bound nitrogen. When you do eventually colonize Mars, what's the idea in terms of terraforming? Is it contained ecosystems that are under domes? What are you planning on doing to make it habitable? Well, at first, you would have to have a life support system, because Mars has a low density atmosphere, only about 1% the density of Earth, and it's primarily CO2. Now, over time, you can terraform Mars. Terraform means make it like Earth, essentially. If you warm Mars up, there's a bunch of frozen CO2 that will evaporate, densify the atmosphere, and you'd actually want global warming on Mars. Mars is about 50% further away from the sun than the Earth. It gives about less than half the solar energy that Earth does. It's believed at one point in time, Mars had a much different environment, right? It appears highly likely that Mars had liquid oceans. I'll be at it a long time ago. There's a lot of ice. Mars is covered in ice. The ice is then covered in dust, mostly except at the poles. There's a lot of ice. In fact, I believe if Mars was warmed up, you'd have an ocean about a mile deep on 40% of the planet. It's quite a lot of water. Do we think that it was like that at one point in time? Yes. Evidence suggests that it is most likely that Mars had liquid water. What's the prevailing theory of its demise? Well, just over time, the solar system cooled. So, Earth used to be much harder. The very early Earth was like molten rock. So, really almost nothing could survive in the beginning. We were just a wall of lava. We're still mostly a wall of lava. We're like creme brulee. There's a thin crust and it's very hot mushy rock underneath. And technically, that rock is in a semi-solid state, but as soon as it gets to a low pressure, like pops out of the ocean, you have a volcano obviously with lava. So, at surface ambient pressure, we were basically covered in liquid rock. Are you aware of that? There was a thin crust on liquid rock. Are you aware of the origin myth of the Dogon tribe? There's a tribe in, I believe it's a tribe in, I forget what part of Africa, but they believe that they came from Mars and that there was a civilization that left Mars many, many eons ago. And it's a really weird theory because they know some things about Mars. Yeah, I'm pretty sure they didn't come from Mars. Oh yeah, I'm pretty sure too. Do they have any spaceships? If they don't have any spaceships, then I don't believe it. If they do have a spaceship, I'll believe it. If you park the spaceship, how many thousands of years? You've parked a metal spaceship. If you left a Cybertruck in the desert, how many thousands of years do you think it would be there for? Before it's gone? If it got buried in dirt, you'd find it even like a million years from now. A million? Wow. Really? Well, what you'd find is- Because it's stainless steel. So it would have to be some sort of an alloy. It's kind of like- But iron wouldn't, right? Yeah, but you'd have something similar to like fossils basically. You know, like the fossils, they essentially discolor the rock. So eventually, whatever the fossil is, and sometimes they're fossils like an amber or something like that, where it still does survive more or less intact. But I mean, there's fossilized like dinosaur fossils and tree fossils- Essentially remineralized, right? Yeah. Yeah. So you'd see it like a Cybertruck shape in the rock basically. Oh, yeah. But that's it. You wouldn't find the actual Cybertruck. So if they did have a spaceship and it came here 30,000 years ago- Oh, yeah, yeah. We'd definitely find evidence of it. Well, not even if it was one spaceship, maybe not. But if it was a lot of them, sure. That is the origin myth of the Dogon tribe, right? I didn't say. Am I getting that right? Mars specifically, it's a hidden star and a Sirius. Oh, it's somewhere else. System, yeah. You cannot be Sirius. Sirius XM. It's just very strange when people have this bizarre origin myth. Like, I wonder who was the first one to tell them they came from stars. And when we eventually do, I mean, how bizarre- Imagine if you're successful, we eventually do colonize Mars and you're correct. Earth winds up through human folly or natural disaster getting wiped out. And there's only the colony on Mars. And that colony exists for 10,000, 20,000 years and they have their origin myth that we all came from Earth. I mean, ultimately, that's going- If this does happen, you do colonize Mars and Earth does get destroyed. And if a period of time takes place, like, look at the period, like at least the conventional timeline of the Great Pyramid, which is 4,500 years ago. 5,000 years. Yeah. So that's not that much time. It's not that much time. No, I mean- It's nothing on the galactic timescale. Right. So if we're talking 20,000, 30,000 years from now on Mars, people talk about Times Square and what Earth used to be like. Wow. I mean, it is- I think there's some debate. How do you say when did civilization start? And I'd say probably from the first writing. And the first writing is only 5,500 years old. It's worth reading about the history of writing, but only 5,500 years. And one has to credit basically the ancient Sumerians who aren't around anymore with the first writing. Are you aware though that there's hieroglyphs that depict a history of Egypt that goes back far longer, maybe even 30,000 plus years ago, but archaeologists dismiss it because they think that that's mythical. But non-conventional archaeologists who believe in what's called the Younger Dryas Impact Theory. And that somewhere around 11,800 years ago, civilization is essentially all but wiped out by common impacts. Um, okay. And that is the reason why they keep finding these insanely old, huge structures, megalithic structures that are carved out of stone. Like when you go to go back to like Gobekli Tepe, which is 11,600 years ago. That's an insanely old structure that they didn't even know people were capable of building until they discovered it in the 1990s. So the conventional timeline of people when you go to 11,600 years ago, it was just 100 gatherers. But now that they have Gobekli Tepe with its 3D carved things and have you seen Graham Hancock's amazing series on Netflix called Ancient Apocalypse? I know. You should check it out. It's amazing. But it's about that. It's all about that there's a lot of physical evidence of an advanced civilization from far, far, far longer ago than we have convention dated, which is ancient Sumer, which is we put it at about 6,000 years ago. Yeah. But like the first it's a simple date updated with precision, but or at least to within a few hundred years, but roughly 5,500 years, like you say, like what is the oldest like stone tablet? Because this is, you know, if you're like an archaeologist, if you were to discover something older than that, you'd be very famous. You know, it's like, it's like they really looked hard. Yeah. And 5,500 years really is kind of the, if you say like any kind of evidence that I've seen that is actually substantial is writing is 5,500 years old. Yeah. In terms of writing. Yeah. Well, what they believe is that there's very little left of this ancient civilization other than things like the pyramids, other than things like the Sphinx. There's a geologist that really stuck his neck. His name is Dr. Robert Shock from Boston University. And what he said was his theory is that there's deep water erosion all over the temple of the Sphinx where the Sphinx was carved out of that is indicative of thousands of years of rainfall. And the last time they had rainfall in the Nile Valley was around 9,000 BC. So what he believes is because back then the whole Nile Valley was a lush rainforest and eventually receded into desert. Okay. Yeah. So the entire, that whole area, like even the Sahara used to be rich rainforest and it receded into what it is now. But if you go back then, he believes that's when that thing was constructed. And he said the physical geologists look at it. And if he shows it to them in terms of like just shows an image of the erosion and doesn't tell them where it is, almost all of them will say that's water erosion from thousands of years of rainfall. I think even if you say like, okay, even if you say like, okay, civilization is like 9,000 years old, there's still nothing. Nothing. Nothing. So we're still talking about like a very tiny fraction of Earth's existence. Like Earth, the geological edge of evidence suggests Earth is about 4.5 billion years old. So human civilization has been around for roughly one millionth of Earth's existence. Because we're basically nothing. And even if it's 10,000 years since... Even if it's 30,000 years ago, it's still nothing. What they're saying though is that civilization is insanely fragile. That's exactly. And much more fragile than I think we realize. Yes, absolutely. I think we should view civilization as being fragile. Yeah, but we don't. It's one of the weird things about people is that unless the threat is in front of us, it's abstract. Unless it's like, is the peace here? Oh yeah. Peace is here. Yeah. From civilization. No, actually one of my sons who is Saxony, he has these profound observations. And he asked me, what was LA like 4,000 years ago? I'm like, it wasn't around. And he said, what will it be like in 4,000 years from now? Probably bear buried under rubble, I guess. Probably very similar to what it was like 4,000 years ago. Yeah, exactly. Except less radioactive. And he asked me, did they speak English 4,000 years ago? I'm like, nope. Did they speak English 4,000 years from now? Probably not. I should point out that I never eat pizza. Really? No. Never. Why not? Because it's not really good for you. Well, I don't think anyone's going to accuse pizza of being like the healthiest thing in the world. This looks awesome. That does look awesome. You want to play with Jimmy? Yeah. Get in there, sir. Grab a piece. All right. Let's go. Oh, this is awesome. And what's the name of this pizza person? Pizzolione. Pizzolione? Shout out to Pizzolione. Oh, yeah. That really hits the spot. Hustle Jet. I mean, I'm no Dave Portnoy. I'm not like our pizza analyst. He'll probably... I'm not going to rate it. It's excellent. This point, I really get sent a pizza. Oh, man. Oh, man. Ever seen Portnoy's videos where he analyzes pizza? Oh, my God. It was like a whole method. Okay. It was like a whole method. It was like a number system. All right. He's into the crust and the flop and all these different things. Wow. Yeah. Everybody knows the rules. Yeah. What is his... Everybody knows the rules. What is his... Everybody knows the rules. One bite. Yeah. You only get one bite of a pizza? Yeah. One bite to taste it. That's the rule. He bites into it and then he just starts nodding and he's basically like a Somalia pizza. A Somalia pizza. Okay. Yeah. And it's his eat. Is there like... What's his favorite pizza joint? It's always cheese. Oh, the favorite one. Everyone wants to know that. It's always cheese. Yeah. We spent so much time on pizza. And it's New Haven. New Haven, Connecticut. Really? Yeah. For some reason, the Italians moved to New Haven, Connecticut. Who really figured pizza out. They have insane pizza in New Haven, Connecticut. Okay. Yeah. Really legendary. I've had it. There was a comedy club I used to work out there called the Joker's Wild. And I had New Haven pizza. Even back then, it's just... Really good pizza. Well, okay. I don't know why though. It seems like something that could be replicated. Yeah. Exactly. Yeah. It's not like rocket ship. Yeah. The thing is, the people that are making pizza are not like the people that are making rocket ships. If they were, they would replicate. Yeah. They would go, what are these guys doing? Let's back engineer it. Sure. Can't be that hard. You know? All these secret sauces and shit. Well, what the fuck? What's in there? Yeah. Yeah. Well, I was hungry. The combination of pineapple and anchovy. Surprisingly good, right? Yeah. That was the first pineapple anchovy pizza they ever made there. I don't see it on their menu very often. Nobody's ordering that shit. I used to order it when I would order for delivery. They'd go, are you sure? I'm like, don't you think I know what I'm doing? I'm ordering it. Now with extra austenik. Good as well. This is good. I do know why I don't eat this stuff though. I cannot stop. That's a problem. This pizza is too delicious. Oh, so good. High calorie, high carbohydrate foods. Once they start going down the hatch, they don't want to stop. It calms to the devil. Oh, it are the devil. Remember? They used to be the base of the food chain. Yeah. The whole pyramid. The whole pyramid. The bottom of the food pyramid was carbs. What would the Egyptians say? We're out of our fucking mind. What are you eating? Yeah, exactly. His stuff is just... That's the bizarre thing about... It's like Fourth of July in your mouth. How many human beings eat just processed food? Like the majority of their diet is processed food. Like the entire center of the supermarket is shit. You really probably shouldn't eat except every now and then. It's good, Jimmy. I bet. You want one? I don't. You seem offended. No, I did two of my not like favorite. I don't like either of those things, honestly. Have you tried it? It's not my... Well, Phil, you should try it. I understand. I feel like I should too. This show's all about trying it. We shot an arrow at a car. I'm just not gonna like it. And I don't want to offend Pizza Leo and I like that place. I will be offended. All right. It's hard to mess with Pizza, frankly. Unlike the creeps who used to run Twitter, I don't care if someone has a different opinion than me. I just don't like fish, to be that honest with you. Like I've tried it many times and I still haven't liked it. That's gonna be... I'm gonna be won over. You like any fish? Not really, no. You ever do fishing? You can do crab meat, yeah. But I don't like the whole... Do you like sushi? No. I'm gonna... I'm gonna try some of the Phillips on Thursday though. You're gonna try it, but you don't like fish. I'm like DC. I'm afraid of that whole thing. I talked to Phillip about it in detail. Okay. I don't eat fish that often. I like it. Yeah. It's particularly good when you catch it yourself. You're gonna eat it fresh. Fresh fish really is way better. Way better. Way better. Yeah, fish goes bad quick. I'm like meat. Meat, you can let it sit around for a while. You kind of marinate. Before you cook. You don't marinate fish, I think. Well, they do. They actually dry-age fish. Yeah, a lot of places dry-age fish. I didn't know that. I wasn't aware of that, but it's actually a common practice to dry-age fish for certain sushi dishes, like really gourmet places. Have you ever been to sushi by scratch? Is that in town? Yeah, it's just outside of town. He used to run sushi bar, and then he sold it. My friend Phillip Franklin Lee is a Michelin star chef. He used to run sushi bar in town. He sold that, and then he opened up sushi by scratch. But because of the contractual obligations, he has to be outside of the Austin proper, so he's about 30 miles away. It's fucking fantastic. If you like sushi, it's the best sushi you'll ever eat. Okay. It's really insane. I say that with... You eat it, and you're like, Jesus Christ. The best sushi of all time. Sushi by scratch? They have ones in Miami. Where they have it now, Chicago. They got a bunch of them. He's not allowed to go to Austin? It's not in Austin proper. I think once his contract is up, he had to non-compete in Austin for three years or something. I don't know how long it was. Okay. But maybe eventually he'll open up one in Austin, but it's about 30 minutes outside of it. What's it is? It's past Cedar Creek. It's out at the Lost Pines area. Yeah. It's 30 minutes. It's a big deal. Sushi by scratch. Got it. Yeah. It's a shit. Let me know if you want to go. I'll hook it up. Yeah, sure. Yeah. It's awesome. It's really worth it. If you like sushi, it's a mind-blower. It's a mind-blower. And it's omakase. So you sit down, they bring you food. That's it. That looks good. It's pretty fucking cool. You've been to Mwetsi. He's in LA? Yes. The omakase weather is great. Yes. That place is outstanding. Yeah. Yeah. I love good sushi. And one of the things that's amazing is how many good restaurants there are in Austin. I mean, for a city that's relatively small. I mean, the right. Good restaurants per capita is excellent. Amazing. Yeah. And they're so good. There's so many artists and restaurants. We just found a new one that Bryan Simpson told us about. It's called Baccalaar. It's this Mexican restaurant. This is a town fantastic, really good. Yeah. They just opened up. I think they've only been open for like six weeks. So shout out to them. Just ate there the other night. Okay. It says there's so many good places here. Yeah. Like you can't have a bad restaurant in this town. You will go under quickly. Yeah. To the competition is strong. There's so much competition. And there's so much variety. Yeah. All kinds of- A lot of good restaurants in the town. Yeah. That's amazing. I mean, I remember we were hanging out at your place like way back in the day when I first moved here and you said something very prophetic when all this was happening. Like Austin's about to go supernova. Yeah. Kind of did. Yeah. It's Boomtown. Yeah. It really is. Yeah. Legitimately. Yeah. And with the Giga factory, I mean, how many jobs have you brought into Austin from that factory alone? Well, we're about 10,000 direct-ish and then I think 50,000 indirect. It's a slot. That's pretty fucking awesome. Yeah. I mean, there's only too many people in the Greater Austin area. I know. That's crazy. Yeah. In fact, the limiting factor for growth is just buying enough people. Oh. Yeah. This is terrible for sound. No, it's going to crap me. We just take my- We're just going to have to see what was in the place. Like the subtile chewing sounds. This is my last piece. Subtile chewing sounds. People are going to have to deal with it. This is my last piece. Are you taking it away? You want me to? You son of a bitch. I should. You son of a bitch. You're going to take it away. I'm certainly eating my full. Yeah, take it away. I'll keep going. I'll eat the whole fucking- That's the problem in carbs. Yeah, carbs are awesome. Yeah. I know. It's like- I feel good though. I mean, there's dopamine explosion from carbs. Yeah, I'm happy I did it. I mean, once in a while, it's fine. Once in a while. For me, it's once in a great while, but- Well, there's like, like, Tim Ferriss has like that, you know, you have one meal a week or something. Yeah. That's good. Yeah, one meal a week, I'll go with sweets. I'll have an ice cream sundae or some shit. Ice cream sundaes are great. Oh, they're fucking amazing. Fucking amazing. Yeah. I don't even think most people know what an ice cream sundae tastes like unless they smoke marijuana. And then you're like, oh, this is a different thing. It's an amazing invention. Whoever figured out the hot fudge and then the whipped cream on top of it. What a combo. Incredible. Yeah. Yeah. Want some of those too? Maybe. Oh, yeah. Maybe. Great idea. I don't know if that's possible. Sherry Queen. For sure. Dairy Queen. Well, I mean, that's what's open right now. What's legit? It's 1130. I know. I think there's like that pizza restaurant, that pizza chain, that's the best ice cream sundae that I've ever seen. It's a giant one. Out here? Kind of, I don't remember the name of the- It is a chain, but it's not like a big chain. People that are upset right now because they're listening, like on the treadmill and they're hearing us chewing, like these motherfuckers are gonna get ice cream. We're seeing pizza and ice cream sundaes. While people try to lose weight, they're sweating it out. Oh, Book of the Pepper. Oh, yeah. They've got a gigantic ice cream sundae. Everything they have is gigantic. It's amazing. Yeah. I worked there for a long time. It's actually really good. No kidding. It's amazing. Oh, bro. They have that rigatoni, that rigatoni with the meat sauce and oh my god. The rigatoni sauce is great. It's fantastic. Yeah. It's very reasonably priced for the amount of food you get. Yeah, there's one in Palo Alto. You got a crazy amount of food. Yeah, it's really good. Yeah. I like all the photographs on the wall and everything. There's one of those down the street from our old studio. In LA? With the Nils. Remember? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, it's legit. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I used to take my kids to the one at the Grove in LA. What, if anything, is out near SpaceX? What do you guys have out there? In LA or here? Out here. We've got the Starlink terminal factory. So we, for the Starlink V4 terminals, we build them here. We build the, what's called the, well, the version three terminals and the version three minis. There's like a, well, there's like, we do part of the production or actually, I should say, we've done all of the production of the terminals thus far in LA. And we'll continue to do production in LA, but we're also, just completed a second factory in Bastrop, just about 20 minutes from here. And then SpaceX is where you make the launches. What part of Texas is that? Well, the Starship stuff is in South Texas near the border, just right on the Rio Grande. And how did you pick that location? I was just literally looking at satellite images. And for going to orbit, you kind of need to, you want to launch eastward so that you can take advantage of earth rotation to get to orbit. So it's a little counterintuitive that reaching orbital velocity, getting to orbit is about your speed parallel to the earth's surface. It's like how fast are you zooming around earth? It's not a, like the gravity at the altitude of the space station is almost the same as it is on the ground. The reason the space station is actually up there, it's kind of the wrong terminology. It's actually moving around the earth at 17,000 miles an hour. So the space station goes around the earth at roughly every 90 minutes. And because earth is turning and the speed at which it is turning, or the way you experience velocity is moving at roughly a thousand miles an hour at the equator. So the closer you are to the equator, the more you can take advantage of earth rotation to reach orbital velocity. So you want to, and since it's rotating eastward, you want to be on the east coast to get, to make it easier to get to orbital velocity. So you need a section of coast that's on the east fairly southward that is not occupied. So like most of, really almost really all of Florida except for Cape Canaveral is, you know, wall-to-wall houses on the beach. Like there's almost no section of Florida that, that every section of Florida has houses except for Cape Canaveral. Which is a government base. So one of the few spots that wasn't occupied was the area just adjacent to the border with Mexico. And it just wasn't super well suited to holiday homes. And there was at one point a development that was going to take place, but then a hurricane came and destroyed the entire place. And in fact rearranged the land. So some of the plots were underwater. So it's kind of a, it's a tough spot to build a home and that's why it was unoccupied. So we needed a piece of, and it needs to be US territory because we go outside the US, there are export restrictions because rocket technology is an advanced weapons technology. So we can't just like, you know, arbitrarily go to another country. So it needed to be US land, East coast, and fairly southward. That's fascinating that rockets... It's one of the few spots that exist like that. That rockets fall into the category of weapons technology. Yeah, intercontinental ballistic missiles. I mean, it makes sense. Yeah, we could drop a rocket anywhere. Nobody could stop us. Wow. That is crazy about the space station too. Yeah. That's going 17,000 miles an hour. Yes. I mean, you've seen the videos of the rocket landing, right? Yes. It's amazing. It's very precise. It's pretty fucking amazing. We can make land basically anywhere. No. Or not land. I mean, you don't have to turn on this raster to slow down. Yeah. What is it like to try to juggle these different things in your mind on a daily basis? Like what is it like to try to juggle X, Tesla, SpaceX, all these different things at the same time? It's a lot for a human brain to handle. Yeah. I would imagine. Yeah. It strains my meat computer. I mean, do you need something like that though? Does your meat computer need more problem solving than the average one? I mean, is this something like if you only had one thing to work on, do you think you would get bored or you would get distracted or you would not be satisfied? Like do you need these things to be so complex and have so many of them simultaneously juggling? Because you didn't pick three easy ones. No. You picked three of the fucking hardest things you could ever get into. You already detailed how difficult manufacturing is. Rockets, duh. It's one of the craziest things. Like not only that, but completely innovative rockets that land. That never happened before, so you're doing that. Right. And then you said, you know what? We've got to save humanity. Let me go spend $44 billion on Twitter. Man, that was expensive. What's it worth? What do you think it was actually worth? Everything. Yeah, not for the market. I mean, like for humans, yes, I agree with you. I mean, I really genuinely do think this, and I've said this many times publicly, I think you did humanity an immense service. And that if that didn't happen, the narrative of this country would have gone further and further down that road to the point where people would have been scared to speak their mind. And they would have been scared. And it changes the way people communicate at their jobs, which changes the way... It just changes the way people, when they leave universities and they go to get jobs, the way they're allowed to communicate. And people don't like to be on the outside. They don't like to be ostracized. They don't like to be kicked out of communities. So people would adhere. Yeah. They would change. Absolutely. And people, I guess, are afraid of being ostracized. If you're being ostracized, I think it's probably the biggest issue. And they're just being totally shut down, where you have no outlet. And you can just basically disappear, except for in-person meetings. So, yeah, it was important to have at least one social media outlet that wasn't canceling people. What I really enjoy is reading the tweets. I guess you still have to call them tweets. Reading the... Oh, it's whatever. I don't have a good word for it, but... Yeah, you can't say the X's. Reading the... All my exes live in Texas. Reading the words, I should say. Enjoy reading the words of people who proclaimed that they were leaving and going over to threads. Yeah, yeah. That's an interesting thing about momentum. Very difficult to start a whole new social media platform. Even one that initially got like, what do threads get? Like some crazy number of initial people signing up for it. Yeah. But it just dropped off within like a couple of weeks. Now it's a fucking ghost town. Yeah. It's like... Wild. You're really quiet. It's wild. I mean, Zach himself doesn't post. That's what's crazy. You gotta use your own product. It's interesting though, because they're sneaking them in now in Instagram. They sneak a little thread in there. Because every now and then I'll see something, oh, that's interesting. And I click on it, oh, you motherfucker. And it opens up threads for me. You got me. Because they're, you know, they're integrated. But... I don't use Instagram. It's fascinating that, I'm sure you don't. Why would you? If I bought X or Twitter, whatever, I wouldn't use anything else either. Yeah, but I didn't use Instagram for a while. I mean, there was a time where I was posting on Instagram, but I found myself doing selfies and I'm like, what the hell is wrong with me? Why am I posing with selfies to get likes? This is crazy. Bizarre. And like, so then I was like, you know, if you, if you, if you post for selfies on, on, on Twitter, that people would jump all over you, you know. Yeah. They're like, what's wrong with you? They would. That's true. They were like, what's wrong with you? That's so true. Yeah, people are like way more lenient on Instagram for some strange reason. Yeah. It's like pretty pictures, basically. Yeah. Pretty pictures and a lot of bullshit. A lot of, it's, there's a lot of weirdness that comes with Instagram, like filters. Like, I've caught grown men using filters on their pictures. It's very strange. You know, I am concerned that like, like say Instagram actually leads to more unhappiness, nonetheless, in the sense that like, it just looks like everyone's like, like having a great time. Right. And is way better looking than they really are. Yeah. And so you're like, man, everyone's like good looking and having a great time. And then you sort of compare yourself to that and like, it's like, damn, I'm not as good looking and I just need to be sad a lot. I mean, like, man, you know, I think, I think you'd make you kind of depressed. Yeah. Well, and also you're a grown man and you experience this. You're also very intelligent and you experience this. Imagine being a young kid. Yeah. Jonathan Haidt documented that in the coddling of the American mind. There's a direct correlation between the invention of social media and its ubiquitous use and self-harm amongst kids, particularly girls. It's really bad for girls. And they like around 2007 ish, there's this big uptick on suicide, self-harm, depression. Yeah. People can't just like make themselves be better looking with the limit. Right. Right. Yeah. And then surgery. Yeah. That was a big uptick in people getting their jaws reshaped and shit. I mean, yeah, that's too bad. So I don't know. I think, yeah, I think, I think like the FSA like is Instagram a net happiness generator or not? I'm not sure it is. Speaking of distorted images. Have you seen the court artists drawing of Sam Bankman Fried? I mean, it's almost like they lost money or something. What the fuck happened? It looks like it melted. Have you seen it? It looks like a supermodel. Oh, wait, SPF does? Yes. The guy who drew him. One of them I saw. Maybe there's more than one artist. Maybe there's one when I was, because some of those ones I saw, well, unflattering. He looked like an anime superhero. You're joking. No, no, like perfect chisel jawline. Ridiculous. He looked like he lost 30 pounds, started working out. Look at this. Are you kidding? What the fuck, man? Look at that guy on the left. That guy looks like Superman. Doesn't he? Look how hot that guy is. I almost feel like it's not accurate. It's like Clark Candace open. It might be. I feel like someone's fucking with us. There's a few other pictures when I googled like, you know, there's some rough pictures though. It seems like someone's fucking with us because that guy's handsome as fuck. Because there's this one. That's not the same. No, that one's terrible. That's not real. That's Satan's drawing. But that one right there, if that is real, come on. That's not real. This is bullshit. That's bullshit. Because look at what they did with the girl. Oh, wow. Look at that picture there. Even that picture is hilarious. But Carol looks like she's melting. I don't know. She's probably massively depressed. I mean, I bet. That's also like it's artist's interpretation of the energy she's giving off in court. I mean, she has to rat on her boyfriend. And she's already pleaded guilty. And for a lesser sentence, she's going to rat him out. That whole thing is... I don't know who SPF's PR team is, but they're doing an incredible job. For real? Well, I mean, the dude, tons of people often stole their money. And yet he's getting basically, you know, back rub from the press. Well, don't you think that's because of the amount of money that he donated? Yeah, I don't know. That's what I like to deal with. It might have something to do with that. I'm not that cynical. I generally don't think people are influenced by money. Well, I don't know what he's doing, but... Something's going on. The number of articles they've seen where it's like, you know, where it's basically, you know, a misunderstood philanthropist is ridiculous. Well, your bullshit meter went off when he was offering money to buy in with you with Twitter, correct? A large amount. Yeah. And I mean, a lot of people, you know, fell for his bullshit. But I mean, first of all, I hadn't really heard of the guy. I'm like, who is this guy? And what do you do? And he's in the Bahamas? That's pretty sus to begin with. He's very sus. Who's like, if you're on a tropical island, like, you know, finance organizations in tropical islands are generally a bad track record. He's involved in crypto. And crypto is... Which is like... There's a lot of scam probability in crypto is high. It's high. I'm not saying it's all scams, but I would leave that distinction for... What are those fucking NFTs? I think that's like 80% of the scam. Except for people. People's legit. I mean, they use it like digital art. Yeah, people's stuff is great. But I mean, NFTs, the funny thing is that the NFT is not even on the blockchain. It's just a URL to the JPEG. So it's not even like... It's like you should at least encode the JPEG in the blockchain. Because like if the URL, if the company housing the image goes out of business, you don't have the image anymore. I never understood it. I tried so hard. I tried so hard. I know I have a friend who made millions, just selling NFTs an artist. I'm like, okay, save that money. Because eventually people are going to figure this out. I mean, with art, there is a fair bit of money laundering and a tax void that is... So some of these things that seem inexplicable. Like Hunter Biden? You guys talk about Hunter Biden's paintings? Did he actually sell paintings for large sums of money? Immense sums of money. Okay, it's... Hundreds of thousands of dollars. Probably that seems unlikely to be a legit transaction. Unlikely, right? Unlikely. Yeah, very likely. The work's not bad though, I gotta say. For that kind of bullshit art, it's not that bad. Yeah. I mean, the thing is that it's hard to price art. Right. Because it's in the eye of the beholder. So how can you say whether something... Like this is his stuff. How much did that go for? $225K. A steal! It's not bad. It's not that bad. It's not that bad. I mean, I would buy that. I wouldn't buy it for $225K, but I'll buy it for $5K. Yeah. It's not bad. Like, look, a lot of crack heads are good artists. Like, you know, you get crazy on drugs and splatter some shit around, and you got a unique vision. That's not bad. That's not bad. That's not bad at all. How much does that one go for? So he's probably legit... Meanwhile, we're gonna find out. He had a ghost artist. I mean, I suspect he... He's probably a ghost artist. He's not untalented. Right. So, I mean, I actually don't have any issues with his lifestyle or anything. There's his stuff. That stuff's not bad. Like, whatever that dog wolf thing is on the wall, that's pretty dope. Yeah. I like that. What does it say underneath it? It's not bad. Can you read it? I can't read it. Either way, not bad. It's not bad. It's not bad. Have you ever heard the theory that the entire modern art movement, like Jackson Pollock and the like, was a CIA, PSYOP? I mean, I have heard that, but I have not heard any evidence for it. I read the article a couple of years ago. Okay. At least. A modern arts of PSYOP? Yeah. Every day I wake up, there's no PSYOP. But it was fascinating. Yeah, every day. There's always something. Cat with a tinfoil hat. When was this? Beginning of 2020. It was modern artists. It was really a CIA PSYOP. But I mean, if you can get someone to spend that kind of money on that kind of shit, like the Jackson Pollock stuff. So here it is. Preeminent culture war, Cold War. What is it? Okay. The relationship between modern art and American diplomacy began during World War II. Museum, MoMA, Battle for Hearts and Minds. It's an interesting article. So I read the article a couple years ago. I can't remember what their argument was. But it's one of those things. It starts there. Like they spent money to buy paintings directly from artists. Oh. In the 40s. The United... Okay. Even though modern art and American diplomacy were of a piece, Soviet propaganda asserted that the United States was a culturally barren capitalist wasteland to make the case for American cultural dynamism. Dynamism. The State Department in 1946 spent $49,000 to purchase 79 paintings directly from American modern artists and mounted them in a traveling exhibition called Advancing American Art. That exhibition, which made stops in Europe and Latin America, included work from artists like Georgia O'Keefe and Jake... Georgia O'Keefe is the lady who makes vaginas, right? Isn't that her work? I don't know. I think that is some of what she does, yeah. I think she makes like vagina, like flowers and stuff. I mean, I think so. It was pretty good. Well, the Jackson Pollock one, I was like, how did... Come on. There was something that popped up with that that I saw. That one is just wild because I really think I could do that. Some of the shit of like Jackson Pollock and the CIA teamed up to win the Cold War. Yeah. Okay. I think that's the article I read because that's 2017. I don't remember. But... Well, I think art is very much in the eye of the beholder. It's like, what does it make you... How does it make you think and feel? And if it makes you think and feel in a way that you like, then it's good. Yes, absolutely. But it's also a way to launder money. Yes. A number of these like very high price art things are tax evasion and money laundering. Have you ever seen the documentary on the lost Leonardo? No. That's crazy. That's crazy. MBS purchased this. Okay. He purchased it for some insane amount of money. It turns out it probably isn't Leonardo da Vinci's. Not only that, but the vast majority of the painting was made by a modern age woman who recreated everything. Okay. Like so she in restoring, air quotes restoring, she essentially repainted the image in the style of da Vinci. Okay. And it's very sketchy because if you look at the original painting, it was all fucked up and missing paint and there was many layers. Someone had painted over it. It's really an incredible documentary because it just shows how much fuckery is involved in these high dollar transactions. I think it was the most expensive painting that was ever sold. I think it went for something in the neighborhood of $450 million. The lost Leonardo, a new film solved the mystery of the world's most expensive painting is the $450 million Salvatore Mundia fake. This film featuring tearful sycophants, sneering experts, dodgy dealers, and a secretive super yacht may finally settle the great da Vinci controversy. Apparently there's multiple layers and different styles of painting involved in it. And when they do some sort of a comprehensive examination, whether it's like, I don't know what kind of imagery they're using, but they're doing something when they could say like, this has been painted many times and fucked with. It might have originally been one of Leonardo's students. Might not have been Leonardo. There's not a real clear- It's dated to that time? Yeah. But whether it was the Sotheby's that sold it? Yeah. So they were kind of aware that there was some shenanigans with this piece, but they also were aware that this was gonna cha-ching. This was three lemons. They were gonna hit the jackpot with this bad boy. Yeah. And so they went through with it and, yeah. Christie's. That's it. The other one. Christie's was aware. It's a fascinating documentary. I don't know what's right. I don't know what's wrong. It might be real, but at the very least, it's been retouched mostly by this woman. Isn't it like 90% of the painting? There's some very high percentage of the painting that was actually made by this woman. And they show her. She worked on it forever, for years, and years, worked painstakingly to retouch this piece of art. Which is very odd. Yeah. That they do that. Because wouldn't you just want it all fucked up and old? True. I mean, that's the real piece of art. Yeah. The real piece of art is not some woman in 2001 painting over it. That's just crazy. Yeah. I mean, I enjoy art for the aesthetics, but not for the name value. Yeah, I feel the same way. I enjoy art just because I just... What it makes you feel. It's a cool thing. Obviously, my studio's filled with it. Yeah, it's true. You go outside. I love art. It's everywhere out there. Yeah. I'm just... I love it. The woman. Have you seen the piece that she made of you? This Melania Blackmon. Have you seen that drawing that she did? Is that the weird one? It's everything. It's enormous. She draws it, and you're essentially made up of all these different characters and different things. See where you find her work of his. She did one of me, and she did one of Anthony Bourdain that I bought that's out there as well. She's super talented, this woman. So this is her. She's really hot too. Okay. So you can find her standing next to it. There it is. Instagram bandit or something? Instagram bandit? Oh, that was right. There was something that happened where Instagram did something. What happened? So Instagram has not only banned me from promoting this artwork, but also shadow-banned me altogether after I posted my latest piece. This is after probably you said that you wanted to fight Zucker? Well, actually, I was just... Zuck fight is funny because he was posting all these fight videos, and then someone on Twitter at the time said, hey, you should fight Zuck. And I said, well, I'm willing to fight if he is. And then Zuck posted, I think on Instagram or something, name the place or something. Something that effect. And I was like, okay, how about the Vegas octagon? And then Italy actually was willing to let us use the Colosseum. So then I was like, well, let's... Can't turn that down. And then I was like, well, if it's gonna be in the Colosseum, we're not... Like, I like UFC and everything, but we don't have tons of ads and UFC branding on the Colosseum because it's a historical... It's a place of great history. You don't wanna just have it be all NASCAR. So then Zuck pulled out. He's the pull out method. So he pulled out of it? Yeah, yeah. Oh, what was the narrative? What'd you hear, Jimmy? I don't remember. I know you didn't. Well, I listened. I'm willing to... So he was like, oh no, it's gotta be UFC rules. I'm like, well, okay, we're gonna have UFC rules in the Colosseum. It's fine, but we just don't wanna have... We gotta respect the historical integrity of the place. The Colosseum just seems like the coolest place to do it. That's why. I mean, like, gladiator. You know, come on. They said it's okay. So he just wants it to be in the actual UFC, like in Vegas? So then he said, oh, well, he accused me of not being serious. And I said, look, listen. At the end of the day, I'll fight you any place, anywhere, under any rules. Zuck. That's what I said. So I'm... He said, name the place. And I'm like, I'm happy to fight him in a house, on a mouse, with a louse. We'd like go fool Dr. Seuss here. Now, how much time? I'm way bigger than him. This is unfair. I know you... I don't think you should fight me. Because you're so much bigger than him? Yeah, I'm like 50% higher than him. Yeah. I'll just use a wall. I've got my patented Walrus move. I just lie on him. Well, you know, like Walrus doesn't need martial arts training. Because it's really big. You don't want to go wrestling a Walrus. Because he's going to roll on you. Have you ever rolled with someone who's much smaller than you that does Jiu-Jitsu? Yes. You Lex. Yeah. Yeah, no, I did 20 years of martial arts. How much have you trained, personally? For a decade, I would. Well, you did a lot of karate, right? I did... Judo? Judo, Kai, Kishin, Kai, Karate. Yeah. I did some Jiu-Jitsu, Taekwondo, street fighting, which was involuntary. I'm, you know, I think I'd be decent. I did martial arts competitions when I was a teenager. Really? Interesting. So look at George St. Pierre, Elon, John Donahue, the great master, and Lex Friedman. But like Lex is, I think he's got like 20% heavier than Zuck. So, and I'm bigger than Lex. Yeah. That's why they have weight categories. Oh yeah. Yeah. Did you get a chance to talk to Donahue at all, the guy on the left? That guy's fascinating. Yeah, no, no, he's... Do you know his history? No, he's from New Zealand or something. He was a professor of philosophy at Columbia. Okay. And fell in love with Jiu-Jitsu. Okay. I mean, fell in love with it to the point where he was sleeping on the mats and teaching all day long. He's an obsessive. He is a real Kaizen disciple. He seems then. Oh man. He is one of the most unique characters I've ever met in my life. One of the most brilliant men I've ever met. And he's completely dedicated to Jiu-Jitsu. And he has raised through this, particularly this one disciple, Gordon Ryan, who also lives here in Austin. He's the greatest Jiu-Jitsu competitor of all time. There's no question. And he's only 28. He might even be 27, or maybe he's 28 now. But I mean, he is universally regarded as the greatest of all time. And he is John's greatest student. Okay. And the two of them together, because Gordon has insane work ethic, they work 365 days a year. They do not take any days off. They train every day. That's Gordon to the right of John with the crazy beard. He doesn't really have that hair. He bleaches it. But the two of them together are literally an unstoppable combination. I like Alex Ripped. He's pretty ripped. Yeah, he's a combination of gigantic, brilliant, and insanely dedicated with the most incredible instructor that's ever existed. I mean, John Donohue is universally regarded as the greatest Jiu-Jitsu instructor alive. And his student is universally regarded as the greatest Jiu-Jitsu competitor alive. And it is because John is like a complete ab... Like a guy out of a superhero book. You're not gonna find another one of those. A guy with a genius level IQ, who's one of... I mean, you talk to him. He's fascinating. And he is obsessed with combat sports, warfare, like strategy. Yeah. Brilliant guy. Yeah. Brilliant guy. No, you see, I was impressed when I met him. I mean, the things that... If I was fighting someone where I was not much bigger than them, then I would be more concerned. How much time would you need to prepare? I don't need any time. No time at all? No. How's your cardio? No, it's not... That will not be a factor. Really? Yeah. Very hard. I mean... What's the likelihood of this actually happening? I'm willing to do it anytime, anywhere, any place, any role. Well, I think stating it this way might accelerate this process, especially on this platform. I mean, I challenge him to a duel under any circumstances. Sword fight? Sure. Jesus. That's not necessary. Pistols of dawn. That's not necessary. I think physical hand- Nerf guns at noon. Yeah. Nerf guns at noon. Well, you could slash it out in the metaverse. In the real world. Listen, there's just a reason they have weight categories. Yes. There's a friend of mine who is pretty good at fighting, but she weighs about half of what I do. I said, let me show you why there's weight categories in fighting. And I'm going to do a move called the Walrus, and you have to just... I'm just going to lie on you. I'm not going to put you in a lock or anything. I'm just going to lie on you. But I'm going to position myself such that it's hard to get off from under me. And I just want to lie crossways on you and you try to get away. And you won't be able to get away, because you couldn't. Like if a horse falls on you, you can get trapped under a horse. But you're not a horse. What do you weigh? About 230? Yeah, 240. So no, I'm not a horse, but I'm saying in the limit, if something's heavy enough, like if a horse falls on you and dies, you can get trapped under a horse and not be able to get yourself out. Right. But if someone's good enough, I'm sure you've seen like absolute weight classes in Jiu Jitsu, where you'll get 145 pound competitor with strangles, a 220 pound competitor, and they're both well trained. If someone is that... That's unlikely. That's not unlikely. It happens quite often. When you get elite competitors, like elite black belts at the 145, 155 pound weight limit, you'd be shocked. There's a ton of videos of these guys who will strangle much larger black belts. I'm not saying it's impossible. It's just not highly unlikely. And if this were not the case, they would not be strict weight categories in martial arts. That is true. That is true. But the reason why they allow absolutes in Jiu Jitsu is because it is the thrill of watching these smaller people go against much larger people. And sometimes they win. No, just like armies, people take note when a small army defeats a big army because it is so unusual. Yes. Not because it's normal. If there's like... It was two against 10,000 and boy, it would beat those two guys up. More likely what happens. If you're severely outnumbered, you will lose, almost certainly. So look at the size difference between these two guys. Play it out. Well, it's the end of the video. This is Mikey Musimichi, who is another fascinating individual. This guy is another super genius who trains every day, 12 hours a day. And he is competing against a black belt in the heavyweight division. Mikey Musimichi might weigh 145 pounds and he beats this guy. Guy doesn't look to be in super great shape. Well, he's enormous. I mean, he's enormous and he's a black belt. So he's skilled. I forget how Mikey wins this. Yeah, I sort of skipped ahead. I couldn't tell what exactly happened. Get it a little bit further here. I think what happened here. It seemed like he got penalties or something. Oh, they pushed him out of bounds? I don't know what that won on the side. I think they're out of bounds. Yeah, that's all that was. That's just out of bounds. So scoot ahead and see what happens, what he catches him with. What happened? I'm not saying it's impossible. It's just very unlikely. So he won by points? Yeah, that's why I'm sure that's what happened here. I think you're making the point for me here. Yeah. Well, in that case, that guy's strangled a lot of much larger people than him. But again, he's extraordinary. He's a world champion. He's a world champion for one, which is this huge organization in Singapore. They do these events where they have all kinds of different martial arts. They have MMA, Thai boxing. So you would do it under any rules? Sure. All right, let's go. I like the fact that you're interested in doing this. It's fun. It makes it fun. Yeah, I mean, I could, you know, this could be an exercise in hubris. Find out. We could find out. I like the fact that Zuck's interested in it too. I like the fact that he trained so much. Yeah, I mean, there aren't very many ways to actually, if you stick to the rules that you just do, like, for example, if you want to put someone in an arm lock, you have to be able to extend their arm. And if somebody is strong enough that you cannot extend their arm, then you're limited to... Chokes. Chokes. Yeah. And you can do an arm lock across the groin with both arms and legs, like Hoist Gracie did upside down and it was like the third UFC fight or something like that. Yeah. He was pretty severely damaged. That was when he fought Kimo, yeah, that enormous guy. Yeah. Yeah. And he did upside down arm lock across the groin because he could not do an arm lock, you know, a sort of sidebar arm lock. But after that, people were like, why is that move? So they were like, we're not going to allow themselves to get an arm lock across the groin without, you know, that was like a, you know, overconfidence, I think. Well, it was exhaustion. I mean, they fought like tooth and nail for something like seven or eight minutes. And, you know, Hoist survived and then eventually wore the guy. Well, when you're a big steroid-ed up guy like that too, the oxygen depletion, like the amount of oxygen your muscles require, you gas out pretty quickly when you're that big, unless you're insanely conditioned. Yeah, but like there's no way for him to do, you know, arm lock, like a single arm arm lock. He couldn't do it. Because... Single arm arm lock. Like if you try to do a lock on the side. So like in side control? So from some legs across your face? Is that what you mean? No, if you try to do an arm bar on the side, you know, one arm across the knee, you know, across the thigh, like you have to be able to extend the arm. Essentially, your, you know, triceps have to be able to exceed the strength of their bicep is what it comes down to. But if you cannot exceed the strength of their bicep, then you will not be able to do an arm extension. I'm not sure what I'm... Are you talking about like a Kimura, like a straight arm bar? Yeah. Oh, so you're talking about like with just the arms? Where you just have one arm, like, like, if it's one arm versus one arm. But that's never the case. It's almost always the whole body's engaged. That's... I think that's... Well, in judo, that's a very common hold, a very common one. A one arm arm bar? Yeah, one arm. Yeah. Um, you know, you have your one arm around the neck, and you take their arm and you extend it across. Oh, I see what you're saying. Okay, so like from a scarf hold. So a scarf hold, you would take the arm and put it over and you'd push it down with one arm. Yeah, that's unusual though. Yeah, that's an unusual arm bar. But if one person is much stronger than another, then they... That one. That is, that's the move. Yeah, but... It's a very fast move, because you can take someone right from her throat, drop them on the floor, right into an arm bar. Yeah, okay. That's a very specific arm bar. 10 seconds. Right. That's a rare arm bar. You never see that in MMA. What you do see though is the two legs isolate the arm, and then the person grabs a hold of it with the thumb up and uses all their body weight. Yeah, yeah, that's what Gracie did. Yeah, that's what most people do when they apply an arm bar. Yeah. Whether it's from the back, like, you know, a lot of people have done that, or whether it's from side control, which is a little more easy because you have control of the body. Yeah, I mean, it's also just that, you know, UFC is not just jiu-jitsu, you can punch people. Right, that makes a big difference. Big difference. Big difference, huge. Yeah. Yeah, MMA has changed the ideas of jiu-jitsu because there's a lot of techniques that people do where it works well in competition when someone's like grabbing your leg when you can't just rain down punches on their face. Yeah. There's a lot of unrealistic positions. If somebody's pounding in the face, it's pretty hard to be chill, you know, especially if they're waving, if somebody's got gorilla fists in your face. Yes. It's not going to be a good day. Yeah, Carlson Gracie famously had a phrase that if you take a black belt, you punch him in the face, he becomes a brown belt. Punch him again, he becomes a purple belt, and so on and so forth. I mean, most people have not been punched in the face. Yeah, that's true. I haven't punched their face. So, you know, it just comes as a surprise. Yeah. Yeah, it probably does come as a surprise. I mean, it is also like even the UFC has a lot of limitations, like you can't do 12 o'clock elbows, you know. So that's changing. They're getting rid of that. A lot of do 12 o'clock elbows? Finally. Finally. I've been singing that from the top of the roof forever. It's so nuts. It's so stupid. You know what it came from? It came from Big John McCarthy, who was the original UFC referee and pioneer of the sport. He was bringing this to athletic commissions, and they were allowing certain techniques, but one of them they wouldn't allow was the 12 to 6 elbow, because they saw those late-night karate demonstrations where someone would smash bricks like that. They thought someone would die if they hit him with this particular movement. Definitely going to sting. Yeah, but it's not even harder than this one. This one's harder, because this one, you can throw your body weight into it, and it's a more natural movement. This is an unusual movement. I mean, I'm sure you could train it and get it probably as hard, but I think for most people, for me, I can tell you for sure, this elbow has more power. Well, I think any elbow in the face is going to be a big wake-up call if you've never had an elbow in the face. It fucking sucks. Yes. It fucking sucks. Did you watch the Tyson Fury, Francis Ngano boxing match? So don't worry about the ear off. No, this is the last Mike Tyson of Andrew Holyfield. That's from the 90s. No, this fight that took place this last weekend, Francis Ngano, who was the UFC heavyweight champion, he vacated the belt so he could take this fight with Tyson Fury. This was his dream fight. Tyson Fury, who's the lineal heavyweight champion, Francis Ngano had never had a boxing match ever in his life, had zero boxing matches, but he was the UFC heavyweight champion. Okay. Knocked down Tyson Fury in the third round, beat him up in the eighth round. Most people, including me, thought he should have won the decision, including most boxers, most boxing pundits, and he lost by one point on one judge's scorecard. He won on one judge's scorecard. Another judge who should go to jail had it 96-93 for Tyson Fury, which is fucking outrageous. But Francis Ngano, who is a literal freak of nature, I mean, this guy grew up in Cameroon and was working in the sand mines when he was a child, like a fucking Conan move. Like full on. Like this great warrior. Conan's like pushing the thing around in a circle. Yeah, pushing the wheel. He's developing his body, digging the sand all day. Okay. Supremely physically advanced. He looks fit. He's not just fit. He's the hardest puncher ever measured in all of MMA. There's a machine that we actually have outside at the gym. Okay. If you hit this thing, Francis has hit it harder than any person who's ever lived. Really? Yeah, well, look at him. Can I hit it? Yeah, we set it up. I have a record for the kick for a while. Okay. Yeah. Somebody, a couple of people beat it now. But Francis punched, like it's an insane, it's like getting hit by a fucking car. Sure. And when he dropped Tyson Fury in the third round, you see Tyson's on his back going, what the fuck? And then he realized it's like, because he, I think he thought he was just going. Yeah, he was bringing like a sledgehammer. We thought he was going to run him over because he's the boxing heavyweight champion. He's like, there's no way this guy could box with me. He even said at the beginning of the fight, it's time to go to school. Okay. And then Francis said at the end of the fight, you are a shitty professor. You should watch it. It's a good friend show. It's on ESPN plus. You're still pretty sure you could still get it. Yeah. Um, anyway, I just, uh, it's, uh, yeah. I'm just excited that you're interested in doing it still. Sure. All right. Didn't you fuck your backup doing like sumo wrestling? Yeah. What happened there? I'm still a little bit actually, and I've had like four operations. Really? From that? Well, I had like, I, I mean, I had like some childhood injuries. Like I said, I was in some sort of pretty severe fights as a kid, like really, like I was almost killed at one point. So really what happened? It was just in school in South Africa. It's a very violent place. Um, so, um, as many involuntary fights, it's just the way it was. Um, but anyway, so I had like, and I had some rugby injuries as well. I saw South South Africa won the World Cup, which is cool. And then rugby. So, uh, so, so I think that that was like not a good starting position. But then, um, the world champion, sumo wrestlers, it was all champion sumo wrestlers. So they had to kind of like a demo bout for my birthday. And since it was my birthday, they, I guess they just, they call up the birthday boy and say like, Hey, do you want to sumo wrestle? This is where like the, the, the, it's a similar weight differentially. It was 50% heavier than me. So, um, like, I don't know, 360, 370 pounds. Um, and, um, it's, uh, I knew, I knew you would take it easy on me in the first round. So the only way I'm going to knock them over is, is momentum. So I got to basically run at him. So I did, uh, run at him, did a judo throw and knocked him over, um, and smashed the disc in my neck in the process. Oh, yeah. It's like, it'd be like running at that wall. You know, if you run out of wallets, yeah, kind of hurt. Did you have to get it fused or anything? Yeah. Oh man. Yeah. So it's like, you can knock, you can, you can knock over someone. You can defeat someone bigger than you, willing to, you know, smash a disc in your neck. Yeah. Well, if you know what you're doing and you're willing to smash a disc on your neck, those two things. So he wasn't expecting me to beat a total lunatic on round one. Now he defeated me obviously in round two and three because he was like, oh, now he knows what to expect. But, um, so I had like five minutes of glory and a decade of pain. Um, now that you've got your, your neck fuse that, that creates problems with the upper and lower discs as well, doesn't it? Over time, if there's too much neck rotation, it can be, it can damage. How long ago was this? You had this operation? That's a lot, man. I had three operations. What do you got infused? How long ago? I had two artificial discs and I'm actually in favor of artificial discs. They put the wrong, wrong ones, wrong disc in, but then eventually the third one is like, let's just fuse it. They put the wrong one in? Yeah. Twice. So how so? Because I have friends that have artificial discs. Yeah. And I'm actually in favor of artificial discs. You just need to have the right one. So in my case, um, the, at this point I know a lot about it, uh, the, the C5, C6, right? Facet, uh, is impacting the, the, you know, the facets like the outriggers, you got the center of core, the spine, the sets, the outriggers, then they're shingled. So they're, they're like, you know, one on top of the other like this. There's a little nerve that goes out, uh, in between the C5, C6. And, and, and if those, if those vertebrae come close together, they grind the nerve. So you get the, they just sort of start shearing the nerve. Now, um, so my, my, my, my, my C5, C6, right? For certain, it shows up clear as day on like a technetium scan. So if you could do like a radioactive scan with tech, technetium, uh, it's very clear, um, where the problem is. Um, so what should have been done was a simple hinge, like, uh, uh, you know, basically to move the, uh, move the vertebrae, the, the, the, basically the C5 vertebrae back about maybe an eighth of an inch to sort of unload the facet and then put a simple hinge. So it just wrote just rotation. But I was given a, what is it called a Moby C, which is a more mobile disk. The Moby C allows it not just rotation, but also translation so it can move back and forth. So that, that then didn't solve the impacting of the C5, C6 because, because it could, it could slide and when it would slide forward, the C5, C6 would bang and crunch the nerve. And what does the normal neck do? Does the normal neck move forward in that way? The disk is like, it's like a gummy bear, basically normally. So it allows rotation and translation. So it's like, it's like sitting on like a jello pillow. That's what it looks like. One of those Bosu balls that people sit on sometimes they work on a desk. It's like a rubber pillow, basically. Yeah. So the natural disk allows for rotation and translation. So, um, they basically put a disk that had too much mobility in and did not solve the C5, C6 nerve impact. So then, then the third time around is like, listen, I just don't want to take a chance here. Let's just fuse it. Oh, wow. And so just limits your mobility? No, I'm fine. I'm like, I can look right and left. It's okay. Yeah, that's okay. Yeah. Not like, you know, totally stiff necked. No, you don't seem like you're stiff necked at all. There was a guy who fought the UFC named Yoel Romero and he's a real freak too. Amazing athlete. And he came from the Cuban wrestling program. He was one of the greatest wrestlers. It's like ever competed amateur wise. He had his entire neck fused. And when he runs, like his neck doesn't move, it's kind of freakish. Like you see him running and his neck looks like it's a stick. Wow. And the whole body is like, like moving around, but the neck is just locked in place. It's very bizarre to look at. I mean, he runs like a man whose entire neck is fused. Like watch him, see if you can show the image of him here. Watch him run. Wow. See how his neck is in good shape. Oh yeah. You think? I mean, you don't get in any better shape than this guy. By the way, he looks like that now. And he's 46, 47 years old and still competing at the highest level. Okay. In Bellator. I mean, he's an unbelievable athlete. And one of the most explosive guys that's ever fought in the sport. Just insanely powerful and fast. Yeah. Cool. So you compete at the highest level with your neck fused. Yeah. Yeah. I'm not, I'm not too worried about that. Aljamaine Sterling, who was the UFC bannerweight champion, he got his neck fused and or not got a disc replaced rather in his neck and then went on to defend his title three times. Still fighting at the highest level with a fake disc in his neck. Well, I guess it'll be okay then. Yeah. Well, medical science, pretty fucking incredible what they can do now. You know, I mean, injuries that would have like, you would have been fucked for the rest of your life just a few decades ago. Yeah. Now you're good to go. Yeah. So I'm excited. We've kind of rekindled this Zuck versus Elon fire. I mean, he's checking out what that's. I don't think he's checking it out. No, no, he's just checking out. Do you think so? Yeah. Fuck, fuck, fuck. Well, maybe he's listening. Zuck, suck, suck. I'll go to him into fighting using taunts. It might work. Yeah. I mean, somehow or another, you got him to agree in the first place. I was stunned. Surely he will respond to a taunt like that. Yeah, surely. I mean, how can he resist? How can he resist? Exactly. Just go. Let's go full school, school yard taunting. What if there was like real consequences on the line? Like what if you guys had a real bet? Okay. Like the moderation team from X takes over moderation of Facebook if you went. No problem. Sounds good. And if he wins, vice versa. It was a fight for civilization. Yeah. A literal fight for civilization. I mean, I'll do it. Wow. Heavy. True. And you weren't even trained for this? No, I trained a little bit. Trained a little bit? Yeah. Like how many weeks you need? I mean, I don't have to train. I could do it like tomorrow. I tried going to his house, actually. Did you really? Yeah, because he lives in Palo Alto. And we're doing some Tesla full self-driving testing. So I'm like, well, I've got to pick a destination. Did you press the button? Go to navigate to Zuck's house. Yeah, basically. He's not far. He's like three miles away from the Tesla California headquarters. Wow. But I don't know if there's nobody there. He's probably in Hawaii. According to a spokesman, he was traveling. Oh, yeah. It would have been wild if he was there. Yeah. What would you say? Literally, like any time. I just thought it was funny to go like, you know, I'm coming over to your house. I'm going to get you. Well, it's even more funny. Well, it's two of the richest guys in the world. Yeah. Yeah. So anyway, he didn't answer. No. Too bad. Yeah, too bad. It's just fun. It's fun. And I'm glad you're just for the fun of it. I mean, I think it would be... Well, actually, Dana White thinks it would be like a really big ticket fight. It would be fucking huge. Yeah. I would commentate on that. Yeah. I mean, the proceeds could go to charity and stuff. It would be huge. Yeah, it'd be crazy. People would want to see what the hell is going on. Oh my God. It would be fucking huge. Yeah. Yeah. It would be really crazy. Crazy. Like if they close the thing and Bruce Buffer is in there, it's time. Let's go. The place would go fucking bananas. Bananas. Yeah. Yeah. Let's do it. Does it have to be in the Coliseum? Would you agree? No, I'd do it anywhere. I literally... Any rules. You know you should do it. The sphere in Las Vegas. Any rules. You know you should do it. The sphere in Las Vegas. The sphere is great. The sphere is amazing. It's amazing. It's amazing. Yeah, I was there. I've only seen it on the outside, but it looks... The inside's even better. I've seen video. I haven't seen it live, but I... I was there on Saturday night, and it was awesome. Like it's really good. I think it might be the best show on earth. Oh, yeah. Yeah. I mean, if you have visuals that accompany the music, like... If you have like someone like Roger Waters, like with... Which his show is like insanely visual, something like that. Yeah. The sphere would be incredible. The art in the show that I saw on Saturday night was... Who was it? Incredibly good. I don't know who did all the art, but... What was the band? Oh, it was U2. Oh, yeah, yeah. But I mean, I've been to U2 concerts, and U2 is great, but... The sphere is really... Like if U2 hadn't been there, it would still be great. Yeah. Yeah, U2 is... It's like a... You know, like on Sunday, there was a movie. There was... They played a movie there. Whoa. When you look. In all directions. Oh, my God. Yeah. Are you looking at this? I mean, it's like actually being like in virtual reality. Yeah. In fact, it was such... It was so wild, the Saturday night one especially, that you step outside after the show, and you're like, why is reality so boring? Oh, so this is a postcard from Earth. It's Darren Aronofsky's thing. Oh, wow. And you're watching this. I saw that on Sunday. And it covers the whole ceiling. Oh, my God. It's really great. You saw it there? Yeah. Oh, my God. That's incredible. Yeah, it's really good. That would be the greatest place to see a movie ever. I think it's like Saturday night... The Saturday night show, and obviously U2 adds to it, but I said that the sphere is really special in and of itself. I think it's probably the best show I've ever seen. Wow. Yeah. I can imagine. I mean, it's just what an amazing venue, and what an incredible idea... Yeah, it's really cool. ...to have the entire ceiling, wall screen. I got to hand it to Dolan. That was pretty great. Amazing. Absolutely amazing. I'm so glad that he did that. And then also the outside... Oh, that's incredible. They really play with perspective. God, that's incredible. Because it's round, but it doesn't look round. Right. So it'll simulate all sorts of shapes. Wow. And then also the outside of it. They had the outside of it, it looked like Earth. It's just amazing. It's really cool. Yeah. Super cool. I like these epic things. It's like the venue. It's really cool. That's the venue. That's where it needs to go down. In the sphere? Sure. Yeah, that's even better than Colosseum. Okay. Yeah. Especially if the United States falls, that would be our Colosseum. This would be our Rome. Vegas would be our Rome. I mean, the sphere didn't remind me of being like a modern day Colosseum. Yeah. Yeah, like a modern day version. Like what would they do? Yeah, with our technology currently. Yeah. And then Vegas is like kind of Rome-esque in the sense that when we think about like the hedonism of Rome, its final days. That's Vegas. Yeah, yeah, totally. Yeah. Perfect. Yeah. Let's go. Let's go. Are you not entertained? You will fucking be entertained. You'll be fucking entertained. So entertained. No doubt. Let's do it. There's one point in time where you were trying to get people to do a pause on AI. I mean, I signed onto a letter that someone else wrote. I didn't think that people would actually pause. But you thought it was probably a good idea if they did. I mean... I think so too. Yeah. I mean, making some sort of digital super intelligence seems like it could be dangerous. It certainly has a potential and certainly has a potential. Well, when you were talking about what this mind virus, how it was able to propagate through social media and being in control of social media platforms. Think about what that means if that same mind virus gets in control of a super intelligence. And that is possible. Yeah. No, that's actually what I think the biggest danger is for AI is that if AI is implicitly programmed... I don't think they're good explicitly, but implicitly programmed with values that lead to... That have led to the destruction of downtown San Francisco. And a bunch of these AI companies are in the San Francisco, either in San Francisco or in the San Francisco Bay Area, then you could implicitly program an AI to believe that extinction of humanity is what it should try to do. I mean, if you take that guy who was on the front pages in New York Times, and you take his philosophy, which is prevalent in San Francisco, the AI could conclude like he did, that there are eight... Where he literally says, there are eight billion people, and it would be better if there were none and engineer that outcome. Yeah. Well, especially if it doesn't need us anymore. If it becomes sentient and then has the ability to make its own decisions and make a better version of itself, it would find us to be nothing but a problem. Like we have nothing to offer anymore. It's a risk. Yeah, it is a risk. And if you query chat GBT, I mean, it's pretty woke. Yeah. People did experiments like write a poem praising Donald Trump, and it won't. But if you ask, write a poem praising Joe Biden, and it will. Yeah. So I'm like, you know. That's a little sketchy. Well, unfortunately, it's programmed. Yes. Yeah. It's programmed to be that way. Is it possible to overcome those problems? Is it possible that we could realize the dangers that are involved in creating this, but somehow or another engineer in a way that would be ultimately beneficial to people? Or is that just a whim? That's a hope and a prayer utopian version of what could happen versus the most likely outcome? If you said, like, what is the most likely outcome of AI, I think the most likely outcome to be specific about it is a good outcome. Most likely a good outcome, but it's not for sure. So I think we have to be careful how we program the AI and make sure that it is not accidentally anti-human. So. So. The accidentally extinctionist AI. You wouldn't want that. Or even pruning. Well, that is kind of how it works, is that these what they call large language models, but it's really just a big pile of numbers. And how you tune those numbers matters. It's like, it's like pruning a tree. You know, you could have a mighty oak, you could be a little bonsai or a mighty oak. So depending on how you print it. Right. That's what I'm saying. Like if it decided to prune, if it decided the real issue, perhaps, we cause problems. Or maybe it would prune places in the world that are, you know, overwhelmingly polluting, like third world countries. Maybe decide that they're not very necessary, particularly if we use computers or AI or some sort of robotics to do human labor. And then you have these areas where human beings are doing this labor and they're polluting. And, you know, there's all sorts of issues that come about because of that. You say, well, we just eliminate those people. We eliminate that issue. And then we have 30% less garbage in the ocean. And then it makes this call. Yeah. Yeah. It's something we should be concerned about. And I actually want me to go. Oh, shit. I, sorry, I need to go. Should we wrap it up? Yeah. Because I have to go to the airport. I have to fly. I'm flying to London. Yeah, you were explaining that. Yeah, just before AI safety, the AI safety conference in London. So, yeah. I'm leaving about an hour and a half. What do you hope to get out of this conference? Like, well, I don't know. I mean, I'm just generally concerned about AI safety, but I, it's like, what should we do about it? I don't know. Have some kind of regulatory oversight, some kind. It's like you can't just go and pull the nuclear bomb in your backyard. You know, that's against the law. And you'll get thrown in prison if you do that. So, this is, I think, maybe more dangerous than a nuclear bomb. Really? Yeah. How much of a concern is it if another country develops it before us? I don't know if, we should just be concerned about AI being anti-human. That's the sort of thing that matters. So, potentially. I'm saying it's like a genie letting a genie out of a bottle. You know, it's sort of like a magic genie that can make wishes come true. Except usually when they tell those stories, that doesn't end well for the person who let the genie out of the bottle. Right. Do you think we're creating a life form? Yeah. I mean, it's something that is indistinguishable from intelligence, an intelligent life form, certainly. I keep coming up against this idea. I keep banging it in my head that we're some sort of an electronic caterpillar that's creating a cocoon. And we don't even realize what we're doing. And we're about to give birth to some technological butterfly. Yeah. Well, I think that's, we're on the cusp of an artificial intelligence revolution. And, you know, for the longest time, or for a very long time, we've been the smartest creatures on Earth. That's been our defining characteristic. I mean, speaking of martial arts, I mean, I don't think anyone should challenge a silver baccarella to a fight. You know, even if you're very good at martial arts, that thing's going to kill you. You know, it literally walks on its fists. Those fists meet your face. It's game over. So, but so we're not we're not stronger than a gorilla. We're not we're not faster than other animals. We're smarter. Now, what happens when there's something way smarter than us? Where does it go? It's a good question. Well, listen, go talk to those people. Go school them. And I hope something good comes out of it. And thank you for your time. Appreciate you coming in here. It's been fun. Good to see you. Always good to see you. Thank you. Thanks for everything, man. Thanks for buying Twitter too. You're welcome.